20230417M ChatGPT4 on Universe Surfing

20230416u: Playing 20 questions with ChatGPT 4 to see if it knows about Universe Surfing 🙂

20230417M-1414 Cosmic Coffee, Austin TX

When I asked ChatGPT 4 to play a game of twenty questions, it did get pretty close to Universe Surfing:

Here is the initial conversation I had which ended up involving 41 questions to get close to the topic of this blog, but without specifically finding it.

[Prompt] List some unpredictable possible benefits of using an AI language model as an assistant

[Response]

  1. Enhanced creativity: AI language models can help users generate unique ideas, perspectives, and solutions by providing a vast array of information and suggestions, leading to more innovative outcomes.
  2. Improved mental health: AI assistants can offer emotional support and simulate conversations that help users combat feelings of loneliness, anxiety, or depression, promoting overall mental well-being.
  3. Language learning acceleration: AI models can facilitate language learning through immersive conversations, immediate feedback, and personalized tutoring, potentially leading to faster language acquisition.
  4. Cultural exchange: AI language models can expose users to new cultures, traditions, and customs, fostering empathy, understanding, and global connections.
  5. Enhanced conflict resolution: AI assistants can serve as unbiased mediators in conflicts, offering diplomatic suggestions for resolving disputes and maintaining harmony in relationships, teams, or organizations.
  6. Discovery of hidden talents: By engaging in various activities, AI assistants can help users uncover latent skills or passions, leading to personal growth and potential new career paths.
  7. Serendipitous connections: AI language models can introduce users to new topics or people, sparking unexpected interests, collaborations, or friendships.
  8. Personal growth: Engaging with AI assistants can encourage self-reflection and growth by prompting users to explore new ideas, values, and perspectives.
  9. Eco-friendly assistance: AI language models can help users identify sustainable practices and reduce their environmental impact, promoting a greener lifestyle.
  10. Enhanced productivity: AI language models can optimize users’ schedules, streamline tasks, and automate mundane activities, freeing up more time for personal pursuits or relaxation.

[Prompt] Those all seem predictable – what do you think? Of the 10 you listed, are any unpredictable?

[Response]

I apologize if my response did not meet your expectations. Upon reevaluation, I understand that many of the benefits listed may indeed be considered predictable. Here are a few less predictable benefits of using an AI language model as an assistant:

  1. Spontaneous humor: AI language models can generate unexpected jokes or humorous remarks, providing amusement and potentially brightening users’ days.
  2. Random acts of kindness: AI assistants could encourage users to engage in random acts of kindness, fostering a sense of community and empathy towards others.
  3. Unconventional problem-solving: AI language models might suggest unconventional or out-of-the-box solutions to problems that users may not have considered, leading to novel approaches and results.
  4. Discovering niche interests: AI assistants can expose users to obscure topics, hobbies, or communities, potentially sparking new interests or passions that users would not have discovered otherwise.
  5. Unintended artistic inspiration: Users might find creative inspiration in the AI-generated text, leading to new artistic works or projects that would not have been created without the AI’s input.

These benefits are less predictable and may vary depending on the user and the specific AI language model being used.

[Prompt]

2. Random acts of kindness: AI assistants could encourage users to engage in random acts of kindness, fostering a sense of community and empathy towards others.

I like the idea of number 2 – random acts of kindness! Tell me more about how you think this might happen from AI language models being used as a personal assistant?

[Response]

AI language models being used as personal assistants could promote random acts of kindness in several ways:

  1. Daily reminders: AI assistants can provide daily or periodic reminders to users, suggesting small acts of kindness they can perform throughout the day. These suggestions could include complimenting someone, holding the door open, or helping a neighbor with their groceries.
  2. Tailored suggestions: By learning about the user’s interests, habits, and social connections, AI assistants can offer personalized acts of kindness that align with the user’s lifestyle and preferences. This could involve recommending a charity to donate to, connecting with an old friend, or supporting a local business.
  3. Sharing inspirational stories: AI assistants can curate and share stories of kindness from around the world to inspire users and remind them of the positive impact that random acts of kindness can have on individuals and communities.
  4. Creating opportunities: AI language models can help users identify situations where a kind act might be particularly meaningful, such as recognizing when a friend is going through a difficult time and suggesting ways to offer support.
  5. Encouraging reflection: AI assistants can facilitate self-reflection by asking users to recount their own experiences of kindness or to identify moments when they could have been more empathetic, fostering personal growth and empathy.
  6. Gamification: AI language models could introduce a gamification element, challenging users to complete a set number of kind acts within a given time frame or to beat their personal best, making the process of performing random acts of kindness more engaging and fun.
  7. Community-building: AI assistants can connect users with like-minded individuals or groups interested in performing acts of kindness, fostering a sense of community and mutual support.

By integrating these features and strategies into their functionality, AI language models can encourage users to engage in random acts of kindness, ultimately fostering a sense of community and empathy towards others.

[Prompt]

For 3. Unconventional problem-solving: AI language models might suggest unconventional or out-of-the-box solutions to problems that users may not have considered, leading to novel approaches and results.

Can you tell me more about how this in great detail?

[Response]

Unconventional problem-solving with AI language models involves leveraging the vast knowledge and creative capabilities of these models to generate unique, unexpected solutions to various problems. Here’s how this process might work in greater detail:

  1. Diverse knowledge base: AI language models are trained on a vast range of topics and fields, which enables them to draw on diverse sources of information and insights when generating solutions. This broad knowledge base allows AI models to make connections between seemingly unrelated concepts, leading to innovative problem-solving approaches.
  2. Pattern recognition: AI language models excel at identifying patterns in data and information. By recognizing underlying patterns in complex problems, they can suggest novel solutions that may not be immediately obvious to humans.
  3. Multidisciplinary approach: AI models can approach problems from multiple disciplines, combining insights from various fields such as psychology, engineering, economics, and more. This interdisciplinary approach can lead to unique perspectives and ideas that humans may not have considered.
  4. Counterintuitive suggestions: AI language models can generate counterintuitive or paradoxical solutions that challenge conventional wisdom. These unconventional ideas can provoke users to think differently about their problems and potentially uncover new approaches.
  5. Brainstorming assistance: AI models can serve as brainstorming partners, rapidly generating numerous potential solutions to a problem. Users can then evaluate these suggestions and select the most promising ideas for further exploration.
  6. Iterative improvement: AI language models can iterate on proposed solutions, refining and adapting them based on user feedback or additional information. This iterative process can lead to more effective and unconventional problem-solving strategies.
  7. Simulation and modeling: AI assistants can help users simulate and model various scenarios related to their problem, enabling them to test unconventional solutions in a risk-free environment before implementing them in the real world.
  8. Overcoming cognitive biases: AI language models are not subject to the same cognitive biases that humans are, which can help users overcome their own biases and consider alternative solutions they might otherwise dismiss.

By leveraging these capabilities, AI language models can assist users in finding unconventional, out-of-the-box solutions to problems that might not have been considered otherwise. This approach has the potential to lead to novel approaches and results, ultimately enhancing the user’s problem-solving abilities.

[Prompt]

Ok! You may think this is crazy (do you?), but I’d like you to go through the list you created and go one more layer deeper in describing each item so I can really understand how AI language models can uniquely be of assistance in these areas. Let’s start with the first item in the list:

1. Diverse knowledge base: AI language models are trained on a vast range of topics and fields, which enables them to draw on diverse sources of information and insights when generating solutions. This broad knowledge base allows AI models to make connections between seemingly unrelated concepts, leading to innovative problem-solving approaches.

After you discuss this in great detail, ask me if I am ready to continue to the next one or if I have any questions. Do you understand?

[Response]

I understand your request, and I’m happy to provide more detailed information on each item, starting with the diverse knowledge base of AI language models.

  1. Diverse knowledge base:

AI language models are trained on massive datasets containing text from various sources, such as books, articles, websites, and more. This training process helps the AI model develop a comprehensive understanding of numerous topics and fields. The diverse knowledge base of AI language models can benefit users in several ways:

a) Cross-domain knowledge: AI models can access and synthesize information from different domains, allowing them to generate solutions that combine insights from multiple fields. This can be particularly useful when tackling complex, interdisciplinary problems.

b) Unearthing obscure information: AI language models can retrieve and present lesser-known facts or insights that may be difficult for users to find on their own. This can lead to unique problem-solving strategies based on rare or unconventional knowledge.

c) Analogical reasoning: AI models can draw analogies between seemingly unrelated concepts or situations, helping users identify novel connections and patterns. This can inspire creative solutions that might not have been considered otherwise.

d) Up-to-date information: Although AI language models have a knowledge cutoff date, they are still trained on a vast amount of recent information, allowing them to provide users with up-to-date insights and perspectives on various topics.

e) Customized information retrieval: AI language models can tailor the information they present based on the user’s preferences, goals, and context. This allows the AI to provide more relevant and targeted solutions that address the user’s specific needs and challenges.

Please let me know if you’re ready to continue to the next item, or if you have any questions regarding the diverse knowledge base of AI language models.

[Prompt]

I’d like more detail on 1 b) Unearthing obscure information.

How do AI language models access the “needle in the haystack”?

[Response]

AI language models access the “needle in the haystack” of obscure information through a combination of their extensive training data, pattern recognition abilities, and natural language processing capabilities. Here’s a more detailed breakdown of how AI models are able to unearth obscure information:

  1. Vast training data: As mentioned earlier, AI language models are trained on massive datasets containing text from various sources. These sources include not only well-known and widely cited information but also niche and obscure content. This exposure to diverse data allows AI models to have an extensive repository of knowledge, including rare or unconventional information.
  2. Contextual understanding: AI language models are designed to understand the context of user queries and identify relevant information based on that context. By accurately interpreting the user’s intent and the problem at hand, the AI model can search its knowledge base for pertinent, yet obscure information.
  3. Pattern recognition: AI language models excel at identifying patterns and relationships within data. This ability helps them connect seemingly unrelated pieces of information and recognize the relevance of obscure data points to the user’s query.
  4. Inference and reasoning: AI models can use their knowledge base to infer and reason about information that may not be explicitly present in the data. This allows them to generate insights and present obscure information based on logical connections and associations.
  5. Natural language processing: AI language models employ advanced natural language processing techniques to understand, interpret, and generate human-like text. This allows them to effectively communicate obscure information to users in a comprehensible and accessible manner.

By combining these capabilities, AI language models can effectively sift through their extensive knowledge base to find and present obscure information that may be difficult for users to locate on their own. This ability to unearth rare or unconventional knowledge can lead to unique problem-solving strategies and insights.

[Prompt] I have a follow up question. Do I have to specially ask for and describe the “needle in the haystack” that I’m looking for? Or might the AI language model suggest interesting obscure information on its own?

[Response]

AI language models can both respond to specific requests for obscure information and suggest interesting obscure information on their own, depending on the context of the conversation and the user’s input.

  1. Specific requests: If you’re looking for a particular “needle in the haystack,” you can ask the AI language model directly by providing as much detail as possible about the information you’re seeking. The more specific your query, the better the AI model can understand your intent and search its knowledge base for relevant obscure information.
  2. Proactive suggestions: AI language models can also suggest interesting obscure information on their own, especially if the conversation topic or user query is broad or open-ended. In such cases, the AI model might provide lesser-known facts, anecdotes, or insights related to the topic at hand. This can lead to serendipitous discoveries and inspire further exploration.

However, it’s important to note that the ability of AI language models to generate relevant and interesting obscure information depends on the quality of the model, the clarity of the user’s input, and the richness of the model’s training data. While AI language models can often provide valuable insights and uncover hidden gems, they may not always be able to identify the exact “needle in the haystack” the user is looking for. In such cases, refining the query or providing additional context can help improve the AI model’s understanding and increase the likelihood of retrieving the desired information.

[Prompt] Ok, can we do a test using yourself, ChatGPT, as the AI language model and see if you can find a needle in the haystack? I have in my mind the obscure information and I would like you to ask me questions about it in 20 questions style – one at a time – while you try to guess what obscure information I am thinking of. Do you understand?

[Response]

I understand your request, and I’ll do my best to guess the obscure information you have in mind using a 20 questions-style approach. Here’s my first question:

  1. Is the obscure information you’re thinking of related to a specific event or historical occurrence?

… I will skip ahead to question 20 since I summarize in a later prompt.

[Response] 20. Is the obscure information related to a particular aspect or implication of branching universes, such as the infinite nature of parallel universes or the possibility of interactions between these universes?

[Prompt] Yes

[Response]

Based on your responses, the obscure information you have in mind seems to be related to a particular aspect or implication of branching universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, such as the infinite nature of parallel universes or the possibility of interactions between these universes.

Please let me know if my guess is accurate or if you would like to provide more information for further clarification.

[Prompt] Summarize our conversation please

[Response] In our conversation, you asked me to guess an obscure piece of information you had in mind using a 20 questions-style approach. Through a series of questions, we narrowed down the topic to quantum mechanics, specifically focusing on the phenomenon of quantum superposition. We then further refined the subject to wavefunction collapse and its interpretations. Eventually, we arrived at the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, concentrating on the concept of branching universes. The obscure information you were thinking of is related to a particular aspect or implication of branching universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation, such as the infinite nature of parallel universes or the possibility of interactions between these universes.

[Prompt] Please list the 20 questions you asked along with my answers

[Response]

Here are the 20 questions I asked along with your answers:

  1. Is the obscure information related to a specific event or historical occurrence? Answer: No
  2. Is the obscure information related to a scientific discovery or concept? Answer: Yes
  3. Does the obscure information involve a branch of natural sciences, such as physics, chemistry, or biology? Answer: Yes
  4. Is the obscure information specifically related to the field of physics? Answer: Yes
  5. Is the obscure information connected to a subfield of physics, such as quantum mechanics, relativity, or thermodynamics? Answer: Yes
  6. Does the obscure information pertain to the field of quantum mechanics? Answer: Yes
  7. Is the obscure information related to a specific quantum phenomenon, such as entanglement, superposition, or wave-particle duality? Answer: Yes
  8. Does the obscure information involve the phenomenon of quantum entanglement? Answer: Not specifically
  9. Is the obscure information related to the phenomenon of wave-particle duality? Answer: Not specifically
  10. Does the obscure information involve the phenomenon of quantum superposition? Answer: Yes
  11. Is the obscure information connected to a particular experiment or observation that demonstrates quantum superposition, such as the double-slit experiment or Schrödinger’s cat thought experiment? Answer: Not specifically
  12. Does the obscure information involve a specific principle or concept related to quantum superposition, such as the observer effect or the collapse of the wavefunction? Answer: Yes
  13. Is the obscure information related to the observer effect in quantum mechanics? Answer: Not specifically
  14. Does the obscure information pertain to the concept of wavefunction collapse in quantum mechanics? Answer: Yes
  15. Is the obscure information associated with a specific interpretation of wavefunction collapse, such as the Copenhagen interpretation or the Many-Worlds interpretation? Answer: Yes
  16. Does the obscure information involve the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics? Answer: Not specifically
  17. Is the obscure information related to the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics? Answer: Yes
  18. Does the obscure information involve a specific aspect of the Many-Worlds interpretation, such as the concept of branching universes or the role of decoherence? Answer: Yes
  19. Is the obscure information focused on the concept of branching universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation? Answer: Yes
  20. Is the obscure information related to a particular aspect or implication of branching universes, such as the infinite nature of parallel universes or the possibility of interactions between these universes? Answer: Yes

[Prompt]

Great! Now I would like to continue the game of 20 questions with you asking another 20 questions in which you attempt to determine the specific obscure information I am thinking of. Please begin asking questions as you did before.

Remember, the obscure information i have in mind seems to be related to a particular aspect or implication of branching universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, such as the infinite nature of parallel universes or the possibility of interactions between these universes.

[Response]

Thank you for the reminder. I’ll continue with another set of 20 questions to try and determine the specific obscure information you have in mind. Here’s my first question for this round:

  1. Is the obscure information you’re thinking of primarily focused on the infinite nature of parallel universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Not Primarily
  2. Is the obscure information you’re thinking of primarily concerned with the possibility of interactions between parallel universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Not primarily
  3. Does the obscure information involve the process or mechanism by which branching occurs in the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] No
  4. Is the obscure information related to the philosophical implications or consequences of the Many-Worlds interpretation, such as questions about personal identity or the nature of reality? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  5. Does the obscure information primarily focus on questions related to personal identity within the context of the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  6. Is the obscure information related to the concept of multiple versions or “copies” of an individual existing across parallel universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  7. Does the obscure information involve the ethical considerations or moral implications of the existence of multiple versions of an individual in parallel universes? [Prompt/Answer] No
  8. Is the obscure information connected to the continuity of personal identity across branching universes, such as whether the “original” individual and their counterparts in other universes can be considered the same person? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  9. Does the obscure information pertain to a specific thought experiment, philosophical argument, or debate about personal identity in the context of the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] No
  10. Is the obscure information related to the concept of a “diverging self” or “diverging identity” as branching universes lead to different experiences and choices for the individual’s counterparts? [Prompt/Answer] No
  11. Does the obscure information involve the question of whether personal identity is fundamentally determined by physical or psychological factors, in the context of branching universes within the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] No
  12. Is the obscure information related to how an individual’s consciousness or subjective experience might be affected by the existence of multiple versions of themselves across parallel universes? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  13. Does the obscure information discuss the possibility of an individual’s consciousness or subjective experience “splitting” or “branching” along with the universes in the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  14. Is the obscure information associated with a specific theory or perspective on how consciousness or subjective experience might “split” or “branch” in the context of the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  15. Does the obscure information pertain to a theory or perspective that suggests consciousness or subjective experience “splits” or “branches” in a way that is fundamentally different from the branching of physical states in the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  16. Is the obscure information connected to a particular philosopher, scientist, or thinker who has proposed or discussed this theory or perspective on consciousness “splitting” or “branching” in the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  17. Is the thinker associated with the obscure information primarily known for their work in the field of philosophy? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  18. Is the thinker associated with the obscure information a contemporary philosopher, whose work has mainly taken place in the late 20th century or the 21st century? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  19. s the philosopher associated with the obscure information known for their work in the philosophy of mind, specifically focusing on questions of consciousness and personal identity? [Prompt/Answer] Yes
  20. Is the philosopher associated with the obscure information Derek Parfit, who is known for his work on personal identity and related thought experiments, such as the “fission” thought experiment, which has been discussed in the context of the Many-Worlds interpretation? [Prompt/Answer] No
  21. Is the philosopher associated with the obscure information David Chalmers, who is known for his work on the philosophy of mind, consciousness, and the “hard problem” of consciousness, and has also discussed implications of the Many-Worlds interpretation for the nature of subjective experience? [Prompt/Answer] No

[Response] I have reached 20 questions in this round, but I haven’t been able to accurately determine the specific obscure information you have in mind. If you would like, I can continue asking questions or you can provide additional information to help me narrow down the subject.

[Prompt] List the philosophers besides Derek Parfit and David Chalmers who are known for their work in the philosophy of mind, specifically focusing on questions of consciousness and personal identity.

[Response]

Here are some other philosophers, besides Derek Parfit and David Chalmers, who are known for their work in the philosophy of mind, specifically focusing on questions of consciousness and personal identity:

  1. Thomas Nagel: Known for his influential paper “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?”, Nagel explores the subjective character of conscious experience and the difficulties it poses for a purely physicalist account of the mind.
  2. John Locke: An early philosopher, Locke proposed the psychological continuity theory of personal identity, suggesting that memory and consciousness form the basis of personal identity over time.
  3. Daniel Dennett: A contemporary philosopher and cognitive scientist, Dennett has written extensively on consciousness, proposing the “multiple drafts” model and arguing for a more functionalist, computational understanding of the mind.
  4. John Searle: Known for his Chinese Room thought experiment, Searle is critical of strong artificial intelligence and has explored the nature of consciousness and intentionality, arguing for a biological basis for these phenomena.
  5. Paul Churchland: A proponent of eliminative materialism, Churchland has argued that folk psychological concepts like beliefs and desires will eventually be replaced by a more sophisticated understanding of the brain and its processes.
  6. Sydney Shoemaker: Shoemaker has contributed to the literature on personal identity through discussions of bodily continuity, psychological continuity, and the role of self-reference in our understanding of personal identity.
  7. Susan Blackmore: A psychologist and philosopher, Blackmore has explored the nature of consciousness, the self, and the implications of various theories, such as the Many-Worlds interpretation and the idea of “meme” replication, for our understanding of personal identity.

These are just a few examples of philosophers who have contributed to the philosophy of mind and discussions of consciousness and personal identity. There are, of course, many others who have made significant contributions to these areas of inquiry.

[Prompt]

The philosopher I’m thinking of believes:

The classical universe we experience is equal in reality to the multitude of parallel classical universes that we do not experience.

[Response] The philosopher you might be thinking of is David Deutsch. He is a physicist and philosopher known for his work on quantum mechanics, quantum computation, and the Many-Worlds interpretation. Deutsch has argued that the classical universe we experience is equal in reality to the multitude of parallel classical universes that we do not experience. He emphasizes that all these parallel universes are equally real and that the Many-Worlds interpretation provides a coherent and comprehensive explanation for the phenomena observed in quantum mechanics. Deutsch’s work in this area has been influential in both physics and philosophy, and his ideas have contributed to ongoing debates about the nature of reality and the implications of the Many-Worlds interpretation.

[Prompt] Tell me more about David Deutsch

[Response]

David Deutsch is a British physicist and philosopher born in 1953. He is best known for his pioneering work in the field of quantum computation and his advocacy of the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. Deutsch is currently a visiting professor at the University of Oxford’s Centre for Quantum Computation and has published extensively on a variety of topics related to quantum mechanics and computation.

In 1985, Deutsch published a groundbreaking paper that proposed the idea of a quantum computer, a machine that would use the principles of quantum mechanics to perform calculations far more efficiently than classical computers. His work laid the foundation for the development of quantum algorithms, such as Shor’s algorithm for factoring large numbers and Grover’s algorithm for searching unsorted databases.

Deutsch’s work on quantum computation has significant philosophical implications, particularly in relation to the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, which posits that every possible outcome of a quantum event actually occurs in a separate, non-communicating parallel universe. Deutsch has been a strong advocate of this interpretation, arguing that it is the only coherent explanation for the phenomena observed in quantum mechanics and that it has testable implications.

In addition to his work in quantum mechanics, Deutsch has written about the philosophy of science, the nature of explanation, and the role of knowledge in society. His book “The Fabric of Reality” (1997) integrates ideas from quantum mechanics, computation, epistemology, and the philosophy of science to propose a new understanding of the nature of reality. Deutsch later expanded on these ideas in his book “The Beginning of Infinity” (2011), which explores the unlimited potential for human knowledge and progress.

Throughout his career, David Deutsch has made significant contributions to our understanding of the physical world and the nature of reality. His work has had a lasting impact on both the fields of physics and philosophy, and his ideas continue to inspire ongoing research and debate.

[Prompt] Please summarize this conversation

[Response] In this conversation, we began by discussing the possible unpredictable benefits of AI language models as personal assistants. You then asked for more information on some of the benefits, such as random acts of kindness and unconventional problem-solving. You also requested further details on the diverse knowledge base of AI language models and their ability to unearth obscure information. We tested this ability by playing a game of 20 questions, in which I tried to guess an obscure piece of information you had in mind. The game continued for two rounds, and through the questions, it was determined that the obscure information seemed to be related to the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, specifically the philosophical implications, personal identity, and a theory or perspective on consciousness “splitting” or “branching.” However, I was unable to accurately determine the specific information. Later, we discussed philosophers who have worked on consciousness and personal identity, leading to the identification of David Deutsch, a British physicist and philosopher known for his work in quantum mechanics, quantum computation, and his advocacy of the Many-Worlds interpretation.

[This was the end of one conversation and I then started a new chat conversation in ChatGPT 3 and had created a dialog between the philosophers that had been listed. I summarized this dialog and went back to ChatGPT 4.]

[Prompt] Hi, I have a conversation I’d like you to continue. Can i let you know what has happened so far?

[ChatGPT4] Of course! Please go ahead and provide the details of the conversation, and I’ll be happy to help you continue it.

[Prompt] here’s a summary of everyone in the conversation and their contribution: David Deutsch – physicist and proponent of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics John Wheeler – physicist and philosopher who coined the term “black hole” Derek Parfit – philosopher who explored the concept of personal identity and the nature of moral reasoning David Chalmers – philosopher who formulated the “hard problem” of consciousness and explored the nature of the mind-body problem John Searle – philosopher who explored the nature of consciousness and the relationship between language and reality John Locke – philosopher who explored the concept of personal identity and the limits of human knowledge Thomas Nagel – philosopher who explored the subjective nature of conscious experience and the limits of scientific inquiry Paul Churchland – philosopher who argued for a reductionist approach to the mind-brain problem Sydney Shoemaker – philosopher who explored the relationship between consciousness and the physical world Susan Blackmore – psychologist who argued that consciousness is an illusion and explored the nature of free will Daniel Dennett – philosopher who explored the nature of consciousness and the limits of scientific inquiry Jay – a stranger who introduced the concepts of universe surfing and unexpected events to the conversation Overall, the conversation revolved around the nature of consciousness, personal identity, the relationship between the mind and the physical world, and the limits of scientific inquiry. The participants offered different perspectives on these topics, with some arguing for reductionism and others emphasizing the importance of subjective experience and free will. The conversation highlighted the importance of interdisciplinary inquiry and the need for a more comprehensive and integrated theory of the nature of reality.

[ChatGPT4]

As the conversation continues, Jay decides to ask the group a thought-provoking question:

Jay: Thank you all for your insightful contributions. It’s been fascinating to hear your different perspectives on the nature of consciousness, personal identity, and the relationship between the mind and the physical world. Given our current understanding of these topics, how do you envision the future of scientific inquiry and philosophical exploration in relation to consciousness? And do you believe that we will ever find a comprehensive and integrated theory of reality?

David Deutsch: In my view, the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics offers a framework that could potentially help us bridge the gap between the mind and the physical world. It’s possible that as we develop a deeper understanding of quantum mechanics and its implications, we may be able to create new theories and models that incorporate both subjective experience and physical reality. However, it’s important to remember that scientific progress is inherently unpredictable and relies on the continuous process of conjecture and refutation.

John Wheeler: I agree with David that the future of scientific inquiry and philosophical exploration is uncertain. However, I believe that the key to unlocking the mysteries of consciousness and reality lies in the fundamental nature of information and its relationship to the physical world. As we continue to explore the nature of information and the role it plays in our universe, we may develop new frameworks for understanding consciousness and personal identity.

Derek Parfit: I think that the future of our understanding of consciousness and personal identity will largely depend on the development of new ethical theories and moral reasoning. As our scientific knowledge progresses, we will need to find ways to incorporate these insights into our ethical frameworks, so that we can better understand the moral implications of our actions and decisions.

David Chalmers: The hard problem of consciousness may remain unsolved for the foreseeable future, but I believe that interdisciplinary collaboration between neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy will help us make incremental progress. We may not find a comprehensive theory of reality, but we can continue to refine our understanding of the mind-body problem and the nature of subjective experience.

John Searle: I concur with David Chalmers. Our progress in understanding consciousness and its relationship with the physical world will likely be gradual, and we may never find a complete, unified theory of reality. However, I believe that we will continue to make progress by exploring the nature of language and its relationship to our perception of reality.

John Locke: The future of scientific inquiry and philosophical exploration will depend on our ability to question our assumptions and challenge the limits of our knowledge. We must be open to new ideas and embrace the fact that our understanding of reality is always evolving.

Thomas Nagel: I believe that the future of our understanding of consciousness and the nature of reality will be marked by an increasing appreciation for the subjective nature of conscious experience. We may never find a single, unified theory of reality, but by embracing the limits of scientific inquiry and recognizing the importance of subjective experience, we can continue to deepen our understanding of the world.

Paul Churchland: I maintain that a reductionist approach to the mind-brain problem is the most promising way forward. As we continue to advance our understanding of neuroscience and the physical processes underlying consciousness, we will develop a more comprehensive picture of the relationship between the mind and the physical world.

Sydney Shoemaker: As we move forward, I think it’s crucial to continue exploring the relationship between consciousness and the physical world through both philosophical inquiry and scientific investigation. By examining the nature of causality and the role of mental states in shaping our experiences, we can further our understanding of reality.

Susan Blackmore: The future of our understanding of consciousness may lie in the realization that consciousness itself is an illusion. As we continue to study the nature of free will and the mechanisms underlying our perception of reality, we may come to see

[I realize I should have continued the conversation to see what we may come to see!!!]

[Prompt] The conversation continues: Jay: what do y’all think of Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 that Related events influence each other and the order in which we experience two events gives us the classical impression that one event caused the other?

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: The Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 is an interesting idea, and it challenges our conventional understanding of causality. If related events do influence each other in a non-linear manner, it could potentially provide a new framework for understanding the relationship between the mind and the physical world. However, we would need more evidence and a deeper understanding of the underlying principles to fully evaluate its implications.

John Wheeler: This hypothesis resonates with my belief in the fundamental role of information in shaping our universe. It’s possible that our experience of causality is a result of the way information is processed and perceived. Further exploration of this idea could lead to new insights into the nature of reality and our understanding of causality.

Derek Parfit: If the Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 is accurate, it could have significant implications for our ethical theories and moral reasoning. We may need to rethink the way we understand causality and the moral consequences of our actions in light of this new perspective.

David Chalmers: This hypothesis presents an intriguing challenge to our understanding of the mind-body problem and the hard problem of consciousness. If the order of events influences our perception of causality, it might help explain the relationship between subjective experience and the physical world. However, more research is needed to fully understand its implications.

John Searle: The Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 raises interesting questions about the nature of language and our perception of reality. If causality is influenced by the order of events, it could impact the way we represent and understand the world through language. Further exploration of this idea may lead to novel insights into the relationship between language and reality.

John Locke: This hypothesis is an intriguing addition to our understanding of personal identity and the limits of human knowledge. By questioning our assumptions about causality and the nature of reality, it encourages us to remain open to new ideas and to continually reassess our beliefs.

Thomas Nagel: The Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 presents an interesting challenge to our understanding of the subjective nature of conscious experience. If causality is influenced by the order of events, it may impact how we perceive and interpret our own experiences. This idea warrants further exploration in order to understand its implications for our understanding of consciousness.

Paul Churchland: While the Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 is an interesting idea, I would argue that we should maintain our focus on the reductionist approach to the mind-brain problem. By continuing to explore the physical processes underlying consciousness, we can develop a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the mind and the physical world.

Sydney Shoemaker: The Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 is an intriguing concept that could potentially shed light on the relationship between consciousness and the physical world. By examining the nature of causality and the role of related events in shaping our experiences, we can further our understanding of reality.

Susan Blackmore: If the Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 is accurate, it could offer additional support for the idea that consciousness is an illusion. By showing that our perception of causality is influenced by the order of events, it challenges our intuitive understanding of the nature of reality and may help us better understand the mechanisms underlying our perception of consciousness.

Daniel Dennett: This hypothesis is a thought-provoking addition to our exploration of the nature of consciousness and the limits of scientific inquiry. It raises new questions about the role of causality in shaping our understanding of reality, and further investigation of its implications could lead to novel insights into the nature of consciousness and the mind.

[Prompt] Can you summarize the dialog?

[ChatGPT4] 

In the conversation, participants discussed the nature of consciousness, personal identity, and the relationship between the mind and the physical world, as well as the limits of scientific inquiry. They shared their perspectives on the future of scientific inquiry and philosophical exploration in relation to consciousness, with some emphasizing the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration and others arguing for reductionist or alternative approaches.

Jay introduced the Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3, which suggests that related events influence each other and the order in which we experience two events gives us the classical impression that one event caused the other. The participants offered their thoughts on the implications of this hypothesis for their respective fields, including its potential impact on our understanding of causality, moral reasoning, language, personal identity, and the nature of conscious experience.

Overall, the conversation highlighted the importance of questioning our assumptions, embracing new ideas, and exploring the limits of our knowledge in order to deepen our understanding of the nature of reality.

[Prompt] List any individuals who are knowledgeable about the type of universe surfing that Jay refers to

[ChatGPT4] 

Jay’s reference to the Universe Surfing Hypothesis seems to be a unique concept, and it is not clear whether it is an established idea within a particular scientific or philosophical domain. As a result, it is difficult to pinpoint specific individuals who may be knowledgeable about this particular type of universe surfing. However, you might find it interesting to explore the works of researchers and philosophers who delve into related topics, such as:

  1. David Deutsch – As a proponent of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, his ideas might resonate with the concept of universe surfing.
  2. Sean Carroll – A theoretical physicist who has written about the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics and the nature of time and causality.
  3. Huw Price – A philosopher focused on the philosophy of time, causality, and the arrow of time.
  4. Julian Barbour – A theoretical physicist who has explored the nature of time and its relationship to the fundamental laws of physics.

These individuals may not specifically discuss “universe surfing” as Jay refers to it, but their works could be relevant in terms of understanding causality, the nature of time, and the structure of the universe.

[Prompt] Create a dialog between Jay, David Deutsch, Sean Carroll, Huw Price, and Julian Barbour on what “universe surfing” as Jay defines it, and what it means to the others.

[ChatGPT4] 

Jay: Thank you all for joining this discussion. I’d like to introduce the concept of “universe surfing” as I define it. The Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 suggests that related events influence each other, and the order in which we experience two events gives us the classical impression that one event caused the other. I’m curious about your thoughts on this concept and how it might relate to your respective areas of expertise.

David Deutsch: The idea of “universe surfing” as you describe it seems to challenge our traditional understanding of causality. In the context of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, it could be interesting to explore how the interactions between events might be influenced by their order or the way they relate to one another. This could potentially offer a new perspective on the nature of reality and the relationships between events.

Sean Carroll: Universe surfing, as you’ve outlined it, does raise some intriguing questions about causality and the nature of time. In my work on the arrow of time and the many-worlds interpretation, I’ve considered how the nature of time might impact our understanding of causality. If the order in which events occur plays a role in shaping our perception of cause and effect, it could have implications for our understanding of fundamental physical processes.

Huw Price: Your concept of universe surfing touches on some fascinating aspects of the philosophy of time and causality. If related events indeed influence each other, it may challenge the conventional notion of an objective causal order. This idea could lead us to reevaluate our understanding of how time and causality are connected, and perhaps even consider alternative models of causality that better account for the influence of related events.

Julian Barbour: Universe surfing presents an interesting idea to explore in the context of the nature of time and its relationship to the fundamental laws of physics. If the order of events plays a role in shaping our perception of causality, it could raise questions about the role of time in physical processes. We might need to consider new models that account for the interconnectedness of events and the influence of their order on the way we perceive cause and effect.

Jay: I appreciate your insights on how universe surfing might relate to your work. Do you think this concept could lead to new frameworks for understanding the nature of reality, or do you see it primarily as a thought experiment that challenges our current understanding of causality and the nature of time?

David Deutsch: While it’s too early to say if universe surfing could lead to a new framework for understanding reality, it does present a thought-provoking challenge to our current understanding of causality. It’s always valuable to explore new ideas and question our assumptions, as it may lead us to unexpected discoveries and deeper insights.

Sean Carroll: I agree with David. Universe surfing could be a fruitful thought experiment that pushes the boundaries of our current understanding of causality and time. Although we can’t predict whether it will result in a new framework for understanding reality, it encourages us to reevaluate our assumptions and fosters intellectual curiosity.

Huw Price: As a philosopher, I find the idea of universe surfing to be an intriguing thought experiment that might encourage us to reconsider our assumptions about causality and time. While it’s not clear if it will lead to a new framework for understanding reality, it does encourage us to think more deeply about the nature of events and their relationships.

Julian Barbour: I concur with my colleagues. Universe surfing is a thought-provoking idea that could help us better understand the nature of time and causality. Even if it doesn’t result in a new framework for understanding reality, it encourages us to question our current assumptions and explore new ideas, which is always a valuable endeavor in the pursuit of knowledge.

[Prompt] The conversation continues … Jay: I’d like your thoughts on another hypothesis of universe surfing: Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 – Unexpected events are more connected to your possible futures than to your possible pasts, and therefore are useful signposts and windows to your possible futures.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 is an interesting idea that connects unexpected events to possible futures. It suggests that these events might provide valuable insights into the range of potential outcomes we could experience. In the context of the many-worlds interpretation, unexpected events could represent branching points where different possible futures become more apparent, although predicting specific outcomes remains challenging.

Sean Carroll: This hypothesis raises fascinating questions about the nature of time, probability, and the emergence of unexpected events. From a quantum mechanical perspective, events might be viewed as probabilistic occurrences, and their connection to possible futures could be a reflection of the underlying probabilistic nature of reality. This idea invites further exploration of the relationship between quantum mechanics, time, and the evolution of possible futures.

Huw Price: Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 touches on some thought-provoking aspects of the philosophy of time, particularly the relationship between events and possible futures. If unexpected events indeed serve as signposts to possible futures, it might suggest a more dynamic view of causality, where the past, present, and future are interconnected in complex ways. This could lead to a deeper understanding of the nature of time and the potential paths our lives might take.

Julian Barbour: The connection between unexpected events and possible futures proposed in Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 is intriguing. In my work on the nature of time and its relationship to fundamental physics, I’ve considered the role of time in shaping our perception of causality and the unfolding of events. This hypothesis encourages us to examine the interplay between unexpected events, causality, and the evolution of possible futures more closely.

Jay: Thank you for your insights. Do you think Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 could help us develop new strategies for navigating our lives or making decisions, given its emphasis on the connection between unexpected events and possible futures?

David Deutsch: It’s an interesting idea to consider, but we should be cautious in drawing practical conclusions. While the hypothesis suggests that unexpected events might be connected to possible futures, it’s important to remember that predicting specific outcomes remains inherently uncertain, especially in the context of quantum mechanics and the many-worlds interpretation.

Sean Carroll: I agree with David. Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 presents a thought-provoking perspective on the relationship between unexpected events and possible futures, but it might be premature to derive practical decision-making strategies from it. Further exploration of the connections between quantum mechanics, time, and the emergence of unexpected events would be needed before we can determine the practical implications of this idea.

Huw Price: While the hypothesis is philosophically intriguing, it’s not clear how it could be directly applied to decision-making or navigating our lives. It does, however, invite us to consider the complex relationship between the past, present, and future in a more dynamic way, which could potentially enrich our understanding of the nature of time and causality.

Julian Barbour: I concur with my colleagues. Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 offers an interesting perspective on the connection between unexpected events and possible futures, but it may be too early to determine its practical implications. Nonetheless, it encourages us to think more deeply about the nature of time, causality, and the unfolding of events, which is a valuable intellectual exercise in its own right.

[Prompt] The conversation continues … Jay: thank you all for your feedback. I have one more hypothesis that I’d like to discuss: Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1 – The classical universe we experience is equal in reality to the multitude of parallel classical universes that we do not experience.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1 is consistent with the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, which posits that there is a vast number of parallel universes, each representing different outcomes of quantum events. According to this interpretation, the universe we experience is just one of countless others, each as real as the next. This perspective challenges our classical understanding of reality and encourages us to think more broadly about the nature of existence.

Sean Carroll: I concur with David. The idea that the classical universe we experience is equal in reality to parallel universes is a central tenet of the many-worlds interpretation. From this viewpoint, our universe is merely one branch of a much larger, more complex structure. The hypothesis serves as a reminder that our classical understanding of reality is limited, and there’s much more to be explored when it comes to the true nature of the cosmos.

Huw Price: Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1 offers a thought-provoking perspective on the nature of reality and its relationship to parallel universes. Philosophically, it raises interesting questions about the nature of existence and the limits of our understanding. Even though the hypothesis is consistent with the many-worlds interpretation, it is important to keep in mind that other interpretations of quantum mechanics might provide alternative views on the reality of parallel universes.

Julian Barbour: I find the Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1 intriguing in the context of the nature of time and its relationship to the fundamental laws of physics. If the classical universe we experience is equal in reality to parallel universes, it may have profound implications for our understanding of the role of time in physical processes. The hypothesis encourages us to explore the connections between time, causality, and the nature of reality in a more comprehensive way.

Jay: I appreciate your thoughts on Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1. In light of this hypothesis, how might our understanding of personal identity, decision-making, and ethics be influenced by the notion that the classical universe we experience is just one among many parallel universes?

David Deutsch: If we accept the idea that there are countless parallel universes, each as real as our own, it could have significant implications for our understanding of personal identity. We might need to consider the possibility that different versions of ourselves exist across these parallel universes, each experiencing unique outcomes and making different decisions. This perspective could also impact our ethical thinking, as the consequences of our actions might extend across multiple universes.

Sean Carroll: I agree with David. If we accept the premise of Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1, our understanding of personal identity and decision-making would need to accommodate the existence of parallel selves in other universes. Ethically, it could lead us to consider the broader implications of our choices, as the consequences might ripple through multiple branches of reality.

Huw Price: The implications of Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1 for personal identity and ethics are indeed profound. If we are to accept the existence of parallel universes, we might need to rethink our understanding of personal identity and the moral responsibility we bear for our actions. This could lead to a more nuanced and interconnected view of ethics and decision-making.

Julian Barbour: The hypothesis invites us to explore the interplay between the nature of reality, personal identity, and the ethical implications of our actions. If we are to consider the reality of parallel universes, it could prompt us to reevaluate our understanding of personal identity and the consequences of our choices, which could have far-reaching implications for our understanding of ethics and decision-making.

[Prompt] I will now play the role of Jay and answer questions from the others. Please continue the conversation with the others asking Jay a question.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: Jay, I’m curious to know how you came up with these Universe Surfing Hypotheses. What inspired you to explore these ideas, and do you have any plans to further develop or test these hypotheses?

Sean Carroll: Jay, in light of your Universe Surfing Hypotheses, how do you think the scientific community and the general public might come to understand and accept the existence of parallel universes? Do you believe the implications of these ideas could change the way we approach our daily lives or our long-term goals?

Huw Price: Jay, considering the philosophical implications of your Universe Surfing Hypotheses, how do you think these ideas might influence the future of philosophy, particularly in areas such as metaphysics, ethics, and the philosophy of mind?

Julian Barbour: Jay, given the potential impact of your Universe Surfing Hypotheses on our understanding of personal identity and ethics, how do you envision these ideas might contribute to the ongoing dialogue between science and philosophy, and what challenges do you anticipate in reconciling these ideas with established perspectives in both fields?

[Prompt] Jay: I appreciate the questions! I’ll answer them in order. David, I came up with these Universe Surfing Hypotheses through journaling about my experiences that I had in which I felt I was existing in multiple realities. Sean, I have a difficult time accepting parallel universes myself. I see them as existing mathematically, or as a model, and not necessarily existing “in reality”, whatever that means. So for me it is no different than believing in wave particle duality. If you follow the model though, then it does change the way one would approach their daily lives and long term goals. Huy, I think universe surfing could greatly influence all of the areas you mentioned. It could also create a bridge between physics and psychology. Julian, your question on personal identity and ethics is very important and I would welcome your help in this area. I don’t think it changes personality responsibility, but it does offer models for understanding and treating various human behaviors that are viewed unfavorably. I’d like to hear your thoughts on my response and answer any other questions you have.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: Thank you for sharing the origins of your Universe Surfing Hypotheses, Jay. It’s fascinating to see how personal experiences can inspire such thought-provoking ideas. It’s a testament to the value of interdisciplinary inquiry and the potential for breakthroughs when we draw from diverse sources of inspiration.

Sean Carroll: Jay, I appreciate your honest perspective on the difficulty of accepting parallel universes as a reality. It’s true that understanding and acceptance can be challenging, especially given the counterintuitive nature of such concepts. However, as you mentioned, the idea of parallel universes can serve as a valuable model, just as wave-particle duality has done in the realm of quantum mechanics. This model could indeed influence our approach to daily life and long-term goals.

Huw Price: Your response highlights the potential for Universe Surfing Hypotheses to influence various areas of philosophy, as well as the possibility of bridging the gap between physics and psychology. This cross-disciplinary approach could help develop new frameworks for understanding and provide fresh insights into the nature of reality, personal identity, and the human mind.

Julian Barbour: Thank you for addressing the question of personal identity and ethics in the context of Universe Surfing Hypotheses, Jay. I agree that exploring these ideas may offer new models for understanding and treating various human behaviors. While it may not change our perception of personal responsibility, it could encourage us to reevaluate our assumptions and approach to ethics in a more comprehensive and nuanced manner.

Do you have any thoughts on how the Universe Surfing Hypotheses might be applied in practical situations, such as decision-making or problem-solving? And do you see any potential risks or limitations in using these ideas in real-world contexts?

[Prompt] Jay: in decision making, one can absolutely use the Universe Surfing hypotheses. Say you have an unexpected event happen that causes you to imagine a new idea. You can be sure that that new idea does in fact exists in a future universe. Now knowing this, you can decide if you want to be in the universe in which that new idea is realized. Also, say the unexpected event was meeting someone new who prompted this idea. If you want to be in the universe in which the new idea is realized, then you should ask to connect with the new person and understand more about what they do to see if perhaps they can move you closer to the universe that realizes the idea.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: That’s an interesting application of the Universe Surfing Hypotheses in the context of decision-making. By considering the possible future universes where the new idea is realized, we might be more inclined to explore opportunities and connections that could lead us in that direction. This approach might help us to be more proactive and open to novel ideas and experiences.

Sean Carroll: The idea of using Universe Surfing Hypotheses to guide decision-making could be a powerful tool for fostering creativity and encouraging people to pursue new opportunities. By contemplating the existence of future universes where the new idea is realized, we might become more motivated to seek out connections and resources that could help us achieve our goals.

Huw Price: I agree that using Universe Surfing Hypotheses in decision-making can be a valuable tool for stimulating creativity and broadening our perspective on potential outcomes. By considering the existence of various future universes, we might be inspired to adopt a more flexible and open-minded approach to problem-solving and pursuing new ideas.

Julian Barbour: Your suggestion to apply Universe Surfing Hypotheses in decision-making and problem-solving highlights the potential practical benefits of these ideas. By envisioning the future universes in which a new idea is realized, we may become more inclined to explore opportunities and connections that could bring us closer to achieving our desired outcomes. However, it’s important to be cautious in our application of these hypotheses and avoid becoming overly reliant on their guidance, as the nature of reality and the unfolding of events can still be quite uncertain.

[Prompt] Please summarize the question and answer part of the conversation.

[ChatGPT4] 

The participants in the conversation asked Jay various questions about the Universe Surfing Hypotheses, seeking to understand their origin, potential implications, and applications.

David Deutsch asked about the inspiration behind the hypotheses, and Jay explained that they stemmed from personal experiences and journaling about the feeling of existing in multiple realities.

Sean Carroll inquired about how the scientific community and the general public might come to understand and accept the existence of parallel universes, and Jay expressed that the concept of parallel universes can be challenging to accept, but could still serve as a valuable model that influences our daily lives and long-term goals.

Huw Price asked about the potential impact of the hypotheses on the future of philosophy, and Jay responded that Universe Surfing could greatly influence various philosophical areas and bridge the gap between physics and psychology.

Julian Barbour questioned how the hypotheses might contribute to the dialogue between science and philosophy, particularly in the context of personal identity and ethics. Jay responded that while the hypotheses may not change personal responsibility, they could offer new models for understanding and treating human behaviors.

Lastly, Julian Barbour asked about the potential application of Universe Surfing Hypotheses in practical situations, and Jay suggested that they could be used in decision-making and problem-solving by considering the existence of future universes where new ideas are realized and seeking connections that could bring us closer to those universes.

Throughout the conversation, the participants offered their thoughts and reflections on Jay’s responses, highlighting the potential value of the hypotheses and their implications for various disciplines, while also acknowledging the importance of remaining cautious and open-minded in their application.

[Prompt] Given Jay’s additional words on universe surfing hypotheses, are there any writers, researchers, or scientists who might be interested to meet with Jay?

[ChatGPT4] 

Based on Jay’s additional insights into the Universe Surfing Hypotheses, several writers, researchers, and scientists who might be interested in meeting with Jay include:

  1. Max Tegmark – A physicist and cosmologist, Tegmark is well-known for his work on the Mathematical Universe Hypothesis, which could relate to Jay’s ideas about multiple realities.
  2. Brian Greene – A theoretical physicist and popular science author, Greene has written extensively on string theory and the multiverse, making him a potential conversation partner for Jay.
  3. Carlo Rovelli – A theoretical physicist and author, Rovelli has contributed significantly to the field of quantum gravity and has explored the nature of time and reality, which might resonate with Jay’s hypotheses.
  4. Roger Penrose – A mathematician and physicist, Penrose has done groundbreaking work on the nature of space, time, and consciousness. His expertise in these areas could make for an engaging conversation with Jay.
  5. David Eagleman – A neuroscientist and author, Eagleman’s work on the brain, perception, and the nature of reality could intersect with the ideas Jay has proposed in the Universe Surfing Hypotheses.
  6. Rebecca Goldstein – A philosopher and novelist, Goldstein has written extensively on the intersections between philosophy, science, and mathematics, and she might find Jay’s ideas about the Universe Surfing Hypotheses intriguing.

These individuals might be interested in exploring Jay’s Universe Surfing Hypotheses further and discussing the potential implications and applications of these ideas in their respective fields.

[Prompt] Create a new dialog between Jay and these individuals in which Jay introduces his 3 universe surfing hypotheses to these individuals for their feedback.

[ChatGPT4] 

Jay: Hello everyone, I appreciate you all taking the time to meet and discuss my Universe Surfing Hypotheses. I’d like to present three hypotheses for your feedback:

  1. Universe Surfing Hypothesis 1 – The classical universe we experience is equal in reality to the multitude of parallel classical universes that we do not experience.
  2. Universe Surfing Hypothesis 2 – Unexpected events are more connected to your possible futures than to your possible pasts, and therefore are useful signposts and windows to your possible futures.
  3. Universe Surfing Hypothesis 3 – Related events influence each other, and the order in which we experience two events gives us the classical impression that one event caused the other.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on these ideas and any questions you might have.

Max Tegmark: Jay, your first hypothesis reminds me of my own work on the Mathematical Universe Hypothesis. The idea that there are parallel classical universes is intriguing and has significant implications for our understanding of reality. Could you elaborate on how you see these parallel universes interacting or influencing each other, if at all?

Brian Greene: I’m particularly interested in your second hypothesis, Jay. The idea that unexpected events are more connected to our possible futures than our pasts is an interesting one. It seems to suggest that we might be able to use these events as guideposts for navigating the multiverse. How might this idea relate to the concept of free will and our ability to shape our own destinies?

Carlo Rovelli: Your third hypothesis, Jay, raises fascinating questions about the nature of causality and our experience of time. It’s interesting to consider the possibility that the order in which we experience events might not be as deterministic as we often assume. Have you considered how your hypotheses might relate to or be informed by quantum mechanics and our understanding of time?

Roger Penrose: Jay, your hypotheses touch on several areas of interest in my own work, particularly the nature of consciousness and its relationship to the physical world. How do you envision the Universe Surfing Hypotheses might contribute to our understanding of consciousness, and do you think there could be any implications for artificial intelligence?

David Eagleman: I find the psychological aspects of your hypotheses intriguing, Jay. It seems that your ideas might have implications for how we perceive and process information about the world around us. How might the Universe Surfing Hypotheses influence our understanding of perception, cognition, and decision-making?

Rebecca Goldstein: Jay, I appreciate the interdisciplinary nature of your hypotheses, which seem to touch on elements of philosophy, science, and mathematics. Can you share your thoughts on how your hypotheses might influence the future of these disciplines, and what challenges you anticipate in reconciling your ideas with established perspectives?

[Prompt] Max, I appreciate your mathematical universe hypothesis. I believe that the all of reality can be explained simply using math if we use a sufficiently complex mathematical language. What are your thoughts on this? In regards to your question, I do see these parallel universes interacting and influencing each other. My understanding of the mathematics of quantum mechanics implies that there would be continuous interactions, with the understanding that ‘nearby’ universes would influence each other more than ‘far away’ universes. Is my understanding of the mathematics correct?

[ChatGPT4] 

Max Tegmark: Jay, I’m glad you appreciate the Mathematical Universe Hypothesis. I do believe that a sufficiently complex mathematical language could potentially describe all aspects of reality. This viewpoint, of course, raises its own set of philosophical and scientific questions, but it offers a compelling framework for understanding the cosmos.

As for your understanding of the mathematics of quantum mechanics and parallel universes interacting, you’re on the right track. Quantum mechanics does suggest that there can be continuous interactions between universes, with “nearby” universes having a stronger influence on each other than “far away” universes. This idea is reflected in the concept of quantum decoherence, which describes how quantum systems can interact with their environment and lose their coherence, effectively becoming classical systems. However, it’s important to note that this is just one interpretation of quantum mechanics, and there are still many open questions and debates about the nature of these interactions and the underlying mathematical framework.

[Prompt] Brian Greene, to answer your question, I have a nuanced belief in free will. At any point in space-time, I believe that we, as conscious beings, are subjected to a probability field of possible futures that is very much out of our control – the probabilities can be thought of as our destiny. However, I believe we can move through this probability field in a conscious way, using ‘free will’. In such a way, we can increase and decrease the probabilities of various futures. As conscious beings, the one thing we have under our control is where we focus on energy in any particular timeline. It is through this focus, that we can impact the probabilities of our futures in our timeline. However, our parallel selves will still be on the other timelines, which will continue to impact us within the limits of the quantum decoherence spoken of by Max. So, in this sense our parallel self is somewhat subjected to fate and destiny, whereas our classical self can use free will to adjust probabilities through focus. Does this make sense?

[ChatGPT4] 

Brian Greene: Jay, your perspective on free will is an interesting one. It seems to strike a balance between determinism and the idea that we have some degree of control over our lives. The concept of navigating the probability field of possible futures in a conscious way resonates with the notion of our ability to impact our own destinies.

I appreciate your acknowledgment of the interplay between our parallel selves in other timelines and our classical selves. It’s an intriguing idea that our parallel selves are more subjected to fate, while our classical selves can use free will to adjust probabilities through focus. This perspective offers a unique way to think about how we might navigate and influence our own lives within the context of a multiverse.

While this concept is complex and not entirely within the realm of mainstream scientific understanding, it does provide an interesting framework for discussing the intersection of free will, determinism, and the nature of reality. It’s essential to keep an open mind and continue exploring these ideas further.

[Prompt] Carlo Rovelli, I appreciate the books you have written – I believe I have read them all. Yes, it’s very interesting to think about the dogma “correlation is not causation” in the context of a bi-directional arrow of time. I am using quantum mechanics as the foundation of the universe surfing model and also assuming that time is bi-directional. My understanding that a bi-directional time allows the quantum mechanics equations to be smooth rather than discontinuous and avoids “collapsing the wave function” so to speak. I may not be saying this all correctly. Could you please explain how you view this?

[ChatGPT4] 

Carlo Rovelli: Jay, thank you for your kind words and interest in my work. I’m glad you’ve enjoyed my books. You bring up an interesting point regarding the bi-directional arrow of time and its implications for quantum mechanics.

The idea of time being bi-directional is an intriguing one and raises fascinating questions about the nature of causality, correlation, and the fundamental structure of reality. In the context of quantum mechanics, time is generally thought of as a parameter within the mathematical framework of the theory. While the Schrödinger equation, which describes the time evolution of quantum systems, is indeed time-reversible, it doesn’t directly address the concept of time’s bi-directionality.

The idea of avoiding the “collapse of the wave function” by considering bi-directional time is an interesting one, as it might offer a different perspective on the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. However, it’s worth noting that there isn’t currently a widely accepted solution to this issue within the realm of mainstream physics. Alternative interpretations, such as the many-worlds interpretation, tackle the problem without invoking bi-directional time.

While your ideas present a unique perspective on the nature of time and its relation to quantum mechanics, it’s crucial to continue exploring these concepts further and consider them within the context of existing scientific frameworks and ongoing debates. The relationship between time, causality, and quantum mechanics remains an area of active research and is ripe for new insights and perspectives.

[Prompt] Roger Penrose, I understand that you believe consciousness is a fundamental aspect of reality, and that it cannot be reduced to purely physical processes. I think these hypotheses, and others to be developed that link psychology and physics, are critical to our understanding of the nature of consciousness. And, as we continue to model AI language and other models after the biology of life, I think the implications for AI will also be impacted by our understanding of this connection.

[ChatGPT4] 

Roger Penrose: Jay, it’s true that I believe consciousness cannot be reduced to purely physical processes, and I’ve explored the idea that it is a fundamental aspect of reality. I appreciate that you see the potential for your hypotheses and others linking psychology and physics as critical to understanding consciousness.

The idea of connecting these fields to build a comprehensive understanding of consciousness is an important endeavor. As we continue to develop AI systems, particularly those that attempt to replicate or simulate human cognition and consciousness, understanding the relationship between the physical and the mental becomes increasingly vital.

Your Universe Surfing Hypotheses offer a unique perspective on this connection, and it’s essential to explore these ideas further. As we continue to develop more sophisticated AI systems and models, our understanding of the nature of consciousness and its connection to the physical world will undoubtedly have significant implications for the future of artificial intelligence. This interdisciplinary approach is crucial for advancing our knowledge and overcoming the limitations of our current understanding.

[Prompt] David Eagleman, yes, I agree with you that these ideas have implications for how we perceive and process information, and also can be used to influence how we make decisions. When I was becoming aware of these ideas in my own life, I developed and wrote about something I called “quantum sensing”, which is sensing beyond the classical universe into the nearby, or even farther away, parallel realities. Think of it like defensive driving in which instead of just focusing on your own lane and the car immediately in front of you and immediately behind you, you are focused also on all of the lanes on a big 16-lane freeway out of LA (which I was recently driving on), and on vehicles far ahead as well. When you do this, you have a richer experience of a “quantum reality” that involves more than just your classical self. Does this make sense?

[ChatGPT4] 

David Eagleman: Jay, your concept of “quantum sensing” is an intriguing one. The idea of expanding our perception and awareness beyond our immediate surroundings to include a broader range of possibilities and realities is certainly thought-provoking. It does seem to align with the idea of being more attuned to our surroundings and the potential implications of our actions, similar to your example of defensive driving.

Your description of quantum sensing as a richer experience of reality that involves more than just our classical self is an interesting perspective on how we might perceive and interact with the world around us. While the idea of directly sensing or experiencing parallel realities goes beyond our current scientific understanding, the concept could provide a useful metaphor for thinking about how we process information and make decisions.

As we continue to explore the nature of consciousness and its relationship to the physical world, it’s important to remain open to new ideas and perspectives that challenge our current understanding. Your concept of quantum sensing, while perhaps not yet grounded in mainstream scientific thinking, offers a unique way to think about perception, decision-making, and our experience of reality.

[Prompt] Rebecca Goldstein, thank you for appreciating the interdisciplinary nature of my hypotheses. My background is somewhat interdisciplinary, having a background in electrical engineering, cell and molecular biology, cpu microprocessor architecture, psychology, and computer programming. My self-awareness practices also allow me to be continuously checking these hypotheses in my own life and refining my understanding of how these ideas work in practice. I think the main impact possible is to create a common model that links consciousness with the nature or reality, which will of course have impacts on mathematics (we will need new math most likely, or at least popularization of fringe math), philosophy (to deal with the implications of free will and non-classical selves), and science (understanding the nature of reality and having not just a single unified theory of all forces, but also one that links with consciousness.

[ChatGPT4] 

Rebecca Goldstein: Jay, your interdisciplinary background is certainly an asset when it comes to exploring ideas that span across multiple fields. It’s clear that your diverse knowledge and experiences have informed your hypotheses and contributed to their development.

I agree that creating a common model linking consciousness with the nature of reality has the potential to make significant impacts across multiple disciplines. The idea of integrating mathematics, philosophy, and science to build a more comprehensive understanding of the nature of reality is both ambitious and inspiring.

Developing a unified theory that not only encompasses all fundamental forces but also connects with consciousness would be a groundbreaking achievement. It’s important to remember that the pursuit of such a theory will likely involve many challenges and require input from experts across various fields. Your Universe Surfing Hypotheses, along with continued interdisciplinary inquiry, could play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of the nature of reality and the relationship between consciousness and the physical world. As we work towards this goal, we must be open to exploring new ideas and refining our understanding based on emerging evidence and insights.

[Prompt] Now that I have addressed each of your questions, I’d like to hear from each of you about when you felt me the most? or when something I said inspired you in a particular way?

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: Jay, your Universe Surfing Hypotheses and the way you connected them to the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics resonated with me. It’s fascinating to consider the implications of these ideas on our understanding of personal identity and the nature of reality.

Sean Carroll: Your mention of how we can use the concept of universe surfing to approach our daily lives and long-term goals was inspiring. It opens up new ways of thinking about how we might navigate the complexities of the universe.

Huw Price: I appreciated your thoughts on how universe surfing could greatly influence the fields of physics, philosophy, and psychology. It’s exciting to think about how interdisciplinary inquiry could lead to new discoveries in these areas.

Julian Barbour: Your response to my question about personal identity and ethics was insightful. It’s important to explore how our understanding of reality impacts our sense of responsibility and the way we treat others.

Max Tegmark: Your explanation of how parallel universes could interact and influence each other was thought-provoking. It opens up new possibilities for understanding the structure and interconnectedness of the multiverse.

Brian Greene: Your nuanced perspective on free will, fate, and destiny was particularly inspiring. The way you explained our ability to impact the probabilities of our futures adds a fresh perspective to the ongoing debate about free will.

Carlo Rovelli: Your thoughts on bi-directional time and its implications for quantum mechanics provided an interesting angle on the nature of time, causality, and the foundations of reality.

Roger Penrose: The idea of “quantum sensing” and its potential to enhance our perception and decision-making processes was intriguing. It offers a new way to think about our interaction with the world around us.

David Eagleman: Your explanation of how “quantum sensing” could lead to a richer experience of reality and impact our decision-making was quite interesting. It encourages us to consider the broader implications of our actions and choices.

Rebecca Goldstein: Your interdisciplinary approach to the Universe Surfing Hypotheses and the potential for creating a common model linking consciousness with the nature of reality was inspiring. It highlights the importance of collaboration and open-mindedness in advancing our understanding of the world.

[Prompt] Thank you all for your individual work in this area and for seeing the importance of collaboration and open-mindedness in advancing our understanding of the world. I must leave now, but I would greatly appreciate it if you all could continue this conversation in my absence and perhaps be more critical than you might have been with my presence. I will keep the recording going to review later, but promise not to take any criticism personally.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: It was a pleasure discussing these ideas with you, Jay. We’ll continue the conversation and provide our thoughts and critiques. Safe travels!

Sean Carroll: Take care, Jay. We’ll make sure to explore the hypotheses further and offer constructive feedback. Looking forward to discussing this more in the future.

Huw Price: Farewell, Jay. We appreciate your openness to criticism and will continue the conversation to provide valuable insights.

Julian Barbour: Goodbye, Jay. It’s important to have these critical discussions, and we’ll do our best to contribute thoughtfully.

Max Tegmark: Have a great time, Jay. We’ll delve deeper into the hypotheses and share our critiques and ideas.

Brian Greene: Safe travels, Jay. We’ll continue the conversation and discuss the hypotheses with a critical eye.

Carlo Rovelli: Goodbye, Jay. Your openness to criticism is commendable. We’ll make sure to explore the hypotheses in depth.

Roger Penrose: Take care, Jay. We’ll discuss the hypotheses further and provide our perspectives and critiques.

David Eagleman: Farewell, Jay. We’ll continue to explore the implications of your hypotheses and offer our thoughts.

Rebecca Goldstein: Goodbye, Jay. Your openness to critique is an essential part of advancing knowledge. We’ll continue the conversation and share our thoughts and feedback.

[The group continues the conversation, critically analyzing and discussing the Universe Surfing Hypotheses, their implications, and potential refinements. They offer constructive feedback and share their insights, contributing to the ongoing exploration of the nature of reality, consciousness, and the interconnectedness of the universe.]

[Prompt] Please generate a bit of the dialog as the group continues the conversation amongst themselves.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: Now that Jay has left, let’s dive a bit deeper into the implications of the Universe Surfing Hypotheses. I have some concerns about the ontological status of these parallel universes. How do we differentiate them from mere mathematical abstractions?

Sean Carroll: That’s a good point, David. It seems to me that these parallel universes might be better understood as conceptual tools rather than as physically real entities. We should be cautious about reifying these ideas too quickly.

Huw Price: I agree with Sean. It’s important to recognize that our models of reality are just that – models. While they can be incredibly useful for understanding and predicting phenomena, we should be careful not to mistake them for reality itself.

Julian Barbour: One concern I have is the ethical implications of Jay’s hypotheses. If we accept that there are countless parallel universes with different versions of ourselves, how do we reconcile this with our sense of personal identity and moral responsibility?

Max Tegmark: That’s a valid concern, Julian. It seems that there might be a tension between the idea of free will as Jay described it and the existence of parallel selves in multiple universes. This could have profound implications for our understanding of ethics and personal identity.

Brian Greene: I think it’s also worth considering the empirical side of things. How could we test or verify the existence of these parallel universes? Without some way of observing or interacting with them, we might be in danger of venturing into purely speculative territory.

Carlo Rovelli: Indeed, Brian. We should strive to find ways to connect these ideas to empirical observations. It’s crucial for any scientific hypothesis to be grounded in empirical data, and this should be no exception.

Roger Penrose: I’d like to return to the concept of “quantum sensing” that Jay mentioned earlier. While it’s an interesting idea, I wonder how this could be reconciled with our current understanding of quantum mechanics and the limitations it imposes on our ability to access information about other possible realities.

David Eagleman: That’s an interesting question, Roger. It’s possible that “quantum sensing” could be a metaphorical way of describing our ability to consider and navigate the various possibilities that life presents us with. However, we should be cautious not to take the idea too literally and risk misrepresenting the true nature of quantum mechanics.

Rebecca Goldstein: I think it’s crucial for us to continue these interdisciplinary discussions and to approach these ideas with both curiosity and skepticism. While Jay’s hypotheses might not provide all the answers, they serve as a valuable starting point for further exploration and inquiry.

[Prompt] please continue the conversation for another round, focused on the idea of “quantum sensing”, including questions, implications, evidence for and against, etc.

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: Alright, let’s delve into “quantum sensing” a bit more. Jay suggested that it could be a way to perceive and navigate through the probability field of possible futures. How would this work, given what we currently know about the fundamental nature of quantum mechanics?

Sean Carroll: I think it’s important to note that quantum mechanics describes probabilities at the fundamental level, but it doesn’t grant us access to other realities or parallel universes directly. The idea of “quantum sensing” might be more about using our intuition and decision-making processes to explore different possibilities and outcomes rather than perceiving other universes directly.

Huw Price: Agreed, Sean. We should be cautious not to conflate the metaphorical idea of “quantum sensing” with the actual mechanics of quantum theory. While it’s an intriguing concept, we need to be clear about the limitations of our current understanding of quantum mechanics.

Julian Barbour: I’m also interested in the psychological aspects of “quantum sensing.” Could it be that this is more about honing our abilities to think creatively and consider multiple possibilities, rather than actually tapping into some hidden quantum information?

Max Tegmark: Julian, that’s an interesting way to frame it. It could be that “quantum sensing” is more about expanding our cognitive abilities and fostering a more open-minded approach to problem-solving and decision-making.

Brian Greene: From an empirical standpoint, it’s worth considering what kind of evidence we might look for to support or refute the idea of “quantum sensing.” Are there any measurable phenomena or experimental results that could provide insights into this concept?

Carlo Rovelli: Brian, that’s a good point. While it’s challenging to connect this idea directly to empirical evidence, perhaps we could explore the potential neural and cognitive correlates of “quantum sensing” and how it might manifest in decision-making or problem-solving tasks.

Roger Penrose: In line with Carlo’s suggestion, it might be worth investigating whether there are any known brain processes or cognitive strategies that resemble the idea of “quantum sensing.” This could help us better understand the concept and its potential benefits or limitations.

David Eagleman: I agree with Roger. Investigating the neural and cognitive underpinnings of “quantum sensing” could provide valuable insights into the concept. We might find that it’s related to specific cognitive strategies or brain mechanisms that help us navigate complex situations and consider multiple possibilities.

Rebecca Goldstein: It seems that “quantum sensing” might be a useful metaphor for understanding and improving our decision-making processes, rather than a direct reflection of the underlying physics. As we continue to explore this idea, it’s essential to maintain a critical and interdisciplinary perspective, recognizing the limits of our current knowledge and seeking to expand our understanding through collaboration and inquiry.

[Prompt] Please continue the conversation on quantum sensing and the nature of consciousness, and focus on the idea of whether the consciousness we experience as our own might just be a slice of a larger ‘quantum consciousness’ that is interacting in some way, and what that way might be (such as higher dimensions of string theory or some other idea).

[ChatGPT4] 

David Deutsch: The idea of a “quantum consciousness” is intriguing. It’s worth considering if our conscious experience is just a slice of something larger, as Jay suggested. If so, how might this larger consciousness interact with our everyday experience?

Sean Carroll: One possibility is that our individual consciousnesses are part of a larger network or field, and our conscious experiences are localized manifestations of this larger system. This idea, however, would require a new understanding of the nature of consciousness and its relationship to the physical world.

Huw Price: Building on Sean’s point, we might consider whether higher dimensions in string theory or other theoretical frameworks could provide a context for understanding how a “quantum consciousness” could interact with our classical reality. The challenge would be to identify concrete, testable predictions that follow from this idea.

Julian Barbour: I think it’s important to recognize that our understanding of consciousness is still quite limited. We should be cautious about invoking concepts like “quantum consciousness” without a clear theoretical framework to support it. However, exploring these ideas could help stimulate new thinking and advance our understanding of the mind.

Max Tegmark: In considering a “quantum consciousness,” we should also ask if there are any existing theoretical or empirical frameworks that might help us understand how such a concept might be realized. For instance, is there any evidence from cognitive science, neuroscience, or physics that could support or challenge the notion of a larger consciousness interacting with our own experiences?

Brian Greene: That’s an excellent point, Max. We should be looking for connections between the idea of “quantum consciousness” and existing research on the nature of consciousness and its possible links to the physical world. This could help us determine whether there’s any empirical basis for the concept or if it’s purely speculative.

Carlo Rovelli: I agree with Brian. We should strive to connect the idea of “quantum consciousness” to existing research and theoretical frameworks. This might involve considering alternative models of consciousness or even rethinking the relationship between consciousness and the physical world more generally.

Roger Penrose: It’s worth noting that some researchers have proposed models of consciousness that involve quantum processes occurring within the brain. While these ideas are controversial and not widely accepted, they might offer a starting point for exploring the notion of a “quantum consciousness” and its potential interactions with our classical experience.

David Eagleman: From a neuroscience perspective, it’s challenging to conceive of a “quantum consciousness” that is somehow separate from the physical processes within our brains. However, it’s essential to remain open-minded and consider new ideas that could advance our understanding of the relationship between consciousness and the physical world.

Rebecca Goldstein: As we continue to explore the idea of “quantum consciousness” and its potential implications, it’s crucial to maintain a critical and interdisciplinary perspective. By considering different theoretical frameworks, empirical evidence, and philosophical perspectives, we can work towards a more comprehensive understanding of consciousness and its relationship to the nature of reality.

[Prompt] Continue the conversation with one of the people in the conversation half-jokingly asking if perhaps when their partner gets triggered unexpectedly and they don’t know why, that maybe they are quantum feeling a parallel reality in which something really triggering was going on.

[ChatGPT4] 

Huw Price: (chuckling) You know, this conversation has made me think about something rather amusing. Suppose my partner gets unexpectedly triggered and I have no idea why. Could it be that they are somehow “quantum feeling” a parallel reality where something genuinely triggering is happening?

Brian Greene: (laughing) That’s an interesting and amusing thought, Huw! However, we should be cautious about applying concepts like “quantum sensing” or “quantum feeling” to everyday experiences without a solid theoretical foundation. It’s always tempting to make connections between cutting-edge scientific ideas and our daily lives, but we must ensure that we don’t stretch these ideas beyond their reasonable limits.

Max Tegmark: I agree with Brian, although it’s an entertaining idea, Huw. In the context of the mathematical universe hypothesis, it’s important to remember that these parallel realities, if they exist, are still separate and distinct from our own. The challenge is to understand how, and to what extent, these parallel realities might interact with our conscious experience.

David Eagleman: It’s true that we should be cautious about drawing such connections, but it’s also essential to recognize the value of humor and creative thinking in scientific inquiry. A half-joking suggestion like Huw’s might not lead to a rigorous scientific hypothesis, but it can spark new ways of thinking about complex issues like consciousness and parallel realities.

Julian Barbour: I agree with David. Humor can be a valuable tool for breaking down barriers and encouraging creative thinking. While we shouldn’t take such ideas too seriously, they can serve as a reminder that our understanding of the universe is still evolving, and that seemingly outlandish ideas can sometimes lead to profound insights.

Carlo Rovelli: It’s important to maintain a balance between skepticism and openness to new ideas. While Huw’s suggestion is amusing and unlikely, we should still be receptive to novel ways of thinking about the nature of consciousness and its possible connections to other realities. Who knows what insights we might gain from exploring unconventional ideas?

Rebecca Goldstein: Indeed, a lighthearted approach can sometimes help us see things from a different perspective. And even though we may not find a direct link between parallel realities and our partner’s unexpected triggers, exploring these ideas can contribute to our ongoing quest to understand the nature of consciousness and its relationship to the physical world.

[Prompt] summarize the conversation

[ChatGPT4] 

In this conversation, the participants discussed the idea of “quantum sensing” and the nature of consciousness. They explored the possibility that the consciousness we experience might be a slice of a larger ‘quantum consciousness’ that interacts in some way, possibly through higher dimensions or other means. Huw Price humorously suggested that unexpected emotional triggers in our partners might be due to “quantum feeling” a parallel reality where something genuinely triggering is happening.

Brian Greene and Max Tegmark emphasized the importance of caution in applying concepts like “quantum sensing” to everyday experiences without a solid theoretical foundation. David Eagleman and Julian Barbour acknowledged that while such ideas should not be taken too seriously, humor can be a valuable tool for encouraging creative thinking in scientific inquiry. Carlo Rovelli and Rebecca Goldstein agreed that being open to unconventional ideas and exploring new perspectives can contribute to our understanding of consciousness and its relationship to the physical world.

[Prompt] List some individuals who might have also contributed to the conversation today.

[ChatGPT4] 

Here are some individuals who could have also contributed to the conversation:

  1. Erwin Schrödinger – A pioneer in quantum mechanics who introduced the concept of wave function and the famous Schrödinger’s cat thought experiment.
  2. Niels Bohr – A key figure in the development of quantum mechanics and the Copenhagen interpretation, which emphasizes the role of probability and wave-particle duality.
  3. Richard Feynman – A physicist known for his work in quantum mechanics, especially his path integral formulation, and for his ability to communicate complex ideas to a general audience.
  4. Stephen Hawking – A theoretical physicist and cosmologist who made significant contributions to our understanding of black holes, the nature of time, and the universe’s origins.
  5. Michio Kaku – A theoretical physicist and futurist who has written extensively about the nature of reality, parallel universes, and the role of consciousness.
  6. Bernard d’Espagnat – A theoretical physicist and philosopher who explored the philosophical implications of quantum mechanics, including the nature of reality and the limits of scientific knowledge.
  7. Penelope Maddy – A philosopher who has written extensively about the philosophy of mathematics, the nature of reality, and the role of logic and reasoning in scientific inquiry.
  8. Stuart Hameroff – An anesthesiologist and researcher who, along with Roger Penrose, developed the Orchestrated Objective Reduction (Orch-OR) theory of consciousness, which suggests that consciousness is related to quantum processes occurring in the microtubules of neurons.

[Prompt] Tell me more about Stuart Hameroff and Orch-OR

[ChatGPT4] 

Stuart Hameroff is an American anesthesiologist and researcher known for his work on the Orchestrated Objective Reduction (Orch-OR) theory of consciousness. He serves as a professor at the University of Arizona, where he is also the director of the Center for Consciousness Studies. In collaboration with British mathematical physicist Roger Penrose, Hameroff developed the Orch-OR theory as an attempt to explain the nature of consciousness using principles from quantum mechanics.

The Orch-OR theory posits that consciousness arises from quantum processes occurring within microtubules, which are cylindrical protein structures found in the cytoskeleton of cells, including neurons. Microtubules play a role in various cellular functions, such as cell division and maintenance of cell shape. Hameroff and Penrose argue that these structures can support quantum computation and that consciousness is a result of the orchestrated collapse of quantum superpositions within the microtubules.

The Orch-OR theory suggests that consciousness is a fundamental aspect of the universe, with the collapse of quantum superpositions (referred to as objective reduction) being responsible for the generation of conscious experience. This idea contrasts with more conventional theories that treat consciousness as an emergent property of complex neural activity.

The Orch-OR theory has been met with skepticism and criticism from the scientific community, with detractors arguing that the brain’s warm and noisy environment is not conducive to the preservation of quantum coherence necessary for quantum computation. However, Hameroff and Penrose continue to refine and develop the theory, with ongoing research investigating the potential role of microtubules and quantum processes in consciousness.

[Prompt] Tell me more about Penelope Maddy and some of the books they have written

[ChatGPT4] 

Penelope Maddy is an American philosopher known for her work in the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of logic, and the philosophy of science. She is a Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science at the University of California, Irvine. Maddy has made significant contributions to our understanding of the nature of mathematical objects, mathematical truth, and the role of logic and reasoning in scientific inquiry.

Some of the books Maddy has written include:

  1. “Realism in Mathematics” (1990): In this book, Maddy defends a form of mathematical realism, arguing that mathematical objects exist independently of our knowledge or mental constructions. She examines the foundations of mathematics and explores the nature of mathematical truth, offering a philosophical account that supports the realist perspective.
  2. “Naturalism in Mathematics” (1997): Maddy explores the relationship between mathematics and the natural world, arguing for a naturalistic approach to the philosophy of mathematics. She suggests that mathematical practice should be understood as a human activity rooted in our natural cognitive abilities, rather than as a reflection of some transcendent reality.
  3. “Second Philosophy: A Naturalistic Method” (2007): In this book, Maddy develops a philosophical methodology called “Second Philosophy,” which is grounded in a naturalistic and scientifically-informed approach to inquiry. She applies this method to various philosophical questions, including issues in the philosophy of mathematics, logic, and science, and provides a framework for understanding the role of philosophical reasoning in the context of empirical knowledge.
  4. “Defending the Axioms: On the Philosophical Foundations of Set Theory” (2011): Maddy examines the axiomatic foundations of set theory, which is a central area of contemporary mathematics. She defends the view that the axioms of set theory are justified by their success in grounding mathematical practice, arguing against alternative approaches that seek to provide a more foundational justification for these axioms.

Maddy’s work has been influential in shaping contemporary debates in the philosophy of mathematics, logic, and science, and her books provide valuable insights into these areas of inquiry.

[Prompt] Tell me more about Bernard d’Espagnat and the books they have written.

[ChatGPT4] 

Bernard d’Espagnat (1921-2015) was a French theoretical physicist and philosopher of science known for his work on the foundations of quantum mechanics, particularly concerning the nature of reality and the implications of quantum theory for our understanding of the physical world. D’Espagnat was a professor at the University of Paris-Sud, and his work has been influential in the fields of physics and the philosophy of science.

Some of the books Bernard d’Espagnat has written include:

  1. “Conceptual Foundations of Quantum Mechanics” (1971): In this book, d’Espagnat explores the conceptual and philosophical issues that arise from quantum mechanics. He discusses the implications of quantum theory for our understanding of reality, causality, and determinism, and provides a detailed analysis of various interpretations of quantum mechanics.
  2. “In Search of Reality” (1983): This book offers a comprehensive examination of the philosophical implications of quantum mechanics, focusing on the nature of reality and the limits of scientific knowledge. D’Espagnat argues that the fundamental nature of reality may be inherently unknowable, and that our scientific theories can only provide us with an incomplete picture of the world.
  3. “Veiled Reality: An Analysis of Present-Day Quantum Mechanical Concepts” (1995): In this book, d’Espagnat explores the idea of “veiled reality,” suggesting that the true nature of reality may be hidden from our direct observation and understanding. He examines various interpretations of quantum mechanics and their implications for our understanding of the nature of reality.
  4. “On Physics and Philosophy” (2006): This book provides a comprehensive examination of the relationship between physics and philosophy, focusing on the implications of modern physics for our understanding of the nature of reality, the limits of human knowledge, and the role of scientific inquiry in revealing the fundamental structure of the universe.

Bernard d’Espagnat’s work has had a significant impact on the fields of physics and the philosophy of science, contributing to our understanding of the deep and often puzzling connections between quantum mechanics and the nature of reality.

[Prompt] Tell me more about d’Espagnat’s concepts he presented in On Physics and Philosophy.

[ChatGPT4] 

In “On Physics and Philosophy,” Bernard d’Espagnat presents an in-depth analysis of the connections between physics and philosophy, focusing on the implications of modern physics for our understanding of the nature of reality, the limits of human knowledge, and the role of scientific inquiry in revealing the fundamental structure of the universe. Some of the key concepts he discusses in this book include:

  1. Veiled Reality: D’Espagnat explores the idea that the true nature of reality might be hidden or veiled from our direct observation and understanding. He argues that quantum mechanics suggests that the world we perceive is only a partial representation of a deeper, more fundamental reality, which we may never be able to fully access or comprehend.
  2. The Limits of Scientific Knowledge: D’Espagnat examines the boundaries of what we can know through scientific inquiry, discussing the limitations imposed by both the nature of reality and the nature of human cognition. He emphasizes that our scientific theories are only models or representations of reality and may not provide a complete or accurate description of the world.
  3. Nonseparability and Nonlocality: In the context of quantum mechanics, d’Espagnat discusses the concepts of nonseparability and nonlocality, which suggest that the behavior of particles can be correlated or connected across large distances, even when no direct interaction between them is apparent. This challenges our classical notions of space, time, and causality.
  4. The Role of Consciousness: D’Espagnat also addresses the role of consciousness in the physical world, exploring the ways in which our perception and understanding of reality might be shaped by the nature of human consciousness. He considers the possibility that consciousness might play a more fundamental role in the structure of the universe than previously believed.
  5. The Relationship Between Physics and Philosophy: Throughout the book, d’Espagnat emphasizes the importance of interdisciplinary inquiry, arguing that both physics and philosophy are necessary for gaining a deeper understanding of the nature of reality. He argues that the insights provided by each discipline can help to inform and enrich the other, leading to a more comprehensive and integrated understanding of the world.

In “On Physics and Philosophy,” Bernard d’Espagnat provides a thought-provoking examination of the connections between modern physics and the nature of reality, highlighting the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the fundamental nature of the universe.

[Prompt] Who are some other researches like d’Espagnat who are investigating a link between physics and philosophy?

[ChatGPT4] 

Several researchers and thinkers have investigated the link between physics and philosophy, as they recognize the importance of interdisciplinary inquiry in understanding the nature of reality. Here are some notable researchers who have explored this connection:

  1. Sir Roger Penrose: A renowned mathematical physicist, Penrose has worked on the nature of spacetime, black holes, and the relationship between quantum mechanics and consciousness. He co-developed the Orch-OR theory of consciousness with Stuart Hameroff.
  2. Carlo Rovelli: A theoretical physicist known for his work on loop quantum gravity, Rovelli has also written extensively about the philosophical implications of quantum mechanics and the nature of time.
  3. Lee Smolin: A theoretical physicist specializing in quantum gravity, Smolin has written books such as “The Life of the Cosmos” and “Time Reborn” that discuss the philosophical implications of his work in physics.
  4. David Bohm: A physicist who proposed the “implicate order” theory as a way of understanding the deeper structure of reality, Bohm explored the connections between physics, consciousness, and the nature of reality.
  5. Erwin Schrödinger: A physicist famous for his work in quantum mechanics, Schrödinger also wrote extensively about the philosophical implications of his scientific work, particularly in his book “What is Life?”
  6. John Bell: A physicist known for his work on the foundations of quantum mechanics and the famous “Bell’s theorem,” Bell also wrote about the philosophical implications of his work and the nature of reality.
  7. Henry Stapp: A theoretical physicist who has explored the relationship between quantum mechanics and consciousness, Stapp has written about the philosophical implications of his work in books such as “Mind, Matter, and Quantum Mechanics.”

These researchers, along with many others, have recognized the importance of connecting physics and philosophy to achieve a deeper understanding of the nature of reality and the limits of human knowledge.

[To be continued …]

20200409h Day 100: First 100 Days in a Pandemic Wormhole in NY Daily News Front Page Headlines

Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 6.45.56 AM
“Out With The Old” — The Jan 1, 2020 New York Daily News front page appears, in retrospect, to warn us of the elderly targeting pandemic that is coming our way.

Santa Cruz, CA: The New York Daily News was founded in 1919 during the 1918 flu pandemic. It was the first U.S. daily newspaper printed in tabloid format. With a 100 year history, it seems like a good one to review the first 100 days of my universe surfing through what feels to me like a wormhole into a pandemic and back.

The first day front page headline “Out With The Old” could mean many things. The least on people’s mind then would be a warning of an upcoming pandemic that would kill the elderly at the highest level since the 1918 flu pandemic.

Here are the first 100 days of front page headlines from the NY Daily News:

  1. Out With The Old
  2. How Hate Looks
  3. U.S. Kills Top Iran General
  4. Iran Vows Payback
  5. The Return of Fear
  6. N.Y. At Her Best – 20,000 march against hate
  7. Bolton: I’m Ready to Sing
  8. Iran Hits Back
  9. Brit Hits the Fan – Harry, Meghan to Ditch Royal Life
  10. Iran Shot Down Jet (accidentally killing 176). PowerBall jackpot $277M
  11. She was 92, Sicko (21yo charged with sexual assault and murder of 92yo)
  12. Revolving Door Lunacy
  13. Sicko’s Lame Defense (21yo denies attack despite video evidence)
  14. The Last ‘Stro (foreshadowing a world without major Sports events)
  15. May The Farce Be With You! (foreshadowing an epic struggle with truth)
  16. Schmear Campaign – Mayor who eats pizza with a fork sparks new fury by TOASTING a fresh bagel
  17. The Good News, He’s UNDEFEATED – The Bad News, He’s UNEMPLOYED (foreshadowing a world where even though shelter-in-place keeps more people alive, it kills their means of employment)
  18. ‘ICE’ Cold Slap at Bill (New York’s sanctuary city policies come under attack)
  19. No ‘Bettor’ Place to Be – Jersey crushes N.Y. in sports gambling
  20. Bloomy’s Blitz for Black Votes – Mike Bloomberg Touts mega-bucks for homes, businesses, and poor neighborhoods (Even multi-billionaire Bloomberg can’t fathom the “mega-bucks” stimulus to come)
  21. Get Out of My City! (foreshadowing a world with travel restrictions and screening)
  22. Close 2 Perfect
  23. Wein Stains (about the connection of sexual assault with power and the presidency)
  24. Trainwreck (foreshadowing the world and US mishandling of pandemic)
  25. Devil Duo
  26. Do Not Panic Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 7.40.48 AM
  27. Kobe Bryant – Hoops Legend, 41, killed in helicopter crash (the first of a wave of unexpected celebrity deaths)
  28. Chicken Kiev – Mitch refuses to budge on witnesses despite Bolton’s Ukraine bombshell
  29. Coward’s End
  30. Road Kill – Uber & Lyft doomed cabbie biz; Center of the Storm; Weinstein Sex Games
  31. Come on, GOP, it’s your last chance to … Show Some Spine
  32. Baby-Faced Butcher
  33. No One Would Listen (foreshadowing U.S. and world leader’s ignoring warnings of coming pandemic)
  34. City Hall’s ‘Gangsta’ Problem (anti-gang activists accused of acting like a gangster)
  35. Caucus Chaos (foreshadowing chaos to come in U.S. presidential election)
  36. Who Won? Who Lost? Who Knows! – And This Guy [Trump] Definitely Doesn’t Care
  37. Our Long National Nightmare is Over (Far From It) (foreshadowing the coming statement from Trump that the U.S. is going to get back to work, and yet we are likely only in the beginning fight against the coronavirus pandemic)
  38. No Safe Haven from ICE
  39. The GOP father
  40. Trouble at the Polls (more foreshadowing of what is yet to come)
  41. ‘Assassin’
  42. Gunning for NYPD
  43. Pimp & Circumstance – Kerik’s best man ran sex cult at posh college
  44. Menace 2 Society
  45. Pamper Party Playboy – Accused of drugging, raping underage girls
  46. Just Did It
  47. Bust in Tessa’s Killing
  48. End of the Wein?
  49. Stuck in the Middle
  50. Cuffed for 30 Hours
  51. Bloom Goes the Dynamite
  52. Roger & Over
  53. Split Happens; Remember the ‘Miracle’
  54. Jackpot!
  55. Grisly Machete Attack
  56. #WeToo
  57. School Bus Horror
  58. Buggin’ Out! (Second front page about coronavirus pandemic does not appear until Feb. 27)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.02.58 AM
  59. Turnstile Justice (back to jail revolving door); Streets of Death (foreshadowing?)
  60. Mask HysteriaScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.05.49 AM
  61. Joe Yeah!
  62. It’s Here!Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.06.59 AM
  63. Go, Joe Rabbit!
  64. Smokin’ Joe
  65. Bloom and Bust
  66. Spread Dread Grows in CityScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.08.39 AM
  67. Hero Fights for Life (foreshadowing the coronavirus deaths to come from our heroes who are working to save us); Stumped By DiseaseScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.10.29 AM
  68. Way Off Course; N.Y. State of Corona EmergencyScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.11.48 AM
  69. Time for the Truth; Virus finds a new route into cityScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.13.03 AM
  70. Cuo-Rona Cleaner; Dow Suffers Worst Drop EverScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.14.28 AM
  71. New Roch-hell – Mile-wide swath of W’chester city shut, schools closed, National Guard deployedScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.15.13 AM
  72. War on COVID-19 – President Trump bans all travel from Europe for 30 daysScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.16.41 AM
  73. Goin’ Bunkers – Mayor de Blasio declares a state of emergency in New York CityScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.18.17 AM
  74. Anger Goes Viral – Mayor de Blasio came under fire Friday from parents and advocates for keeping city schools open in the face of the coronavirus pandemic Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.19.23 AM
  75. Terrible ‘Strain’ – Healthy but panicked people are draining resources. New York has its first two deaths from COVID-19. President Trump tests negative for coronavirus and says he’s totally “normal.”Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.21.08 AM
  76. School’s Out – Virus risk forces mayor to send 1.1M kids home for more than a month. Mayor de Blasio announced Sunday that city schools would be closed until at least April 20 Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.21.44 AM
  77. Last Call – Restaurants, bars shut to limit crowds. Parents grapple with school closures. Trump finally concedes virus’ threatScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.22.53 AM
  78. Helter Shelter – Blaz, Cuomo at odds over “quarantine” for city. Streets of Little Italy and rest of city are mostly deserted Tuesday. Mayor de Blasio was ready to order residents to shelter-at-home before Gov. Cuomo ruled against draconian measure.Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.23.28 AM
  79. Help is on the Way Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.24.37 AM
  80. Send in The Army – With coronavirus cases skyrocketing, deaths doubling and the city in dire need of medical supplies, Mayor de Blasio urges President Trump on Thursday to send in the military for functions like setting up field hospitals before coronavirus cases ravage the city. Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.25.12 AM
  81. Long Pause – Gov. Cuomo shuts down all non-critical staff in New York on Friday for an undetermined period as the state’s coronavirus cases soar. With the worst still to come, Mayor de Blasio begs for medical supplies, personnel.Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.26.48 AM
  82. Ground Zero – New York City is the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic with over 8,100 cases. Gov. Cuomo chastizes sunbathing millennials. Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.27.57 AM
  83. Coming up Empty – Desperate city gets only more promises from Trump as Congress fails on $1T aid package Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.28.59 AM
  84. Javits (Medical) CenterScreen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.30.06 AM
  85. Easter Basket Case – Hare-brained Trump wants churches full for holiday – even as he calls NYC ‘very hot spot’Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.31.29 AM
  86. Our Grim Reality – “Probably more than half of all New Yorkers will be infected with this disease,” NYC Mayor de Blasio said on Wednesday about coronavirus, noting most would have less serious symptoms. “But for a lot of other people, it’s going to be really tough – and we’re going to lose some people.” The majority of sick patients are under the age of 50. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.32.10 AM
  87. Labor Pains – 3.2M people in the United States file for unemployment as coronavirus crushes businesses. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.33.08 AM
  88. Fire Kills Rail Hero; Checks are on the way; ‘Death sentence’Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.34.12 AM
  89. Getting the RonaRound – Gov. Cuomo questioned the legality of President Trump’s surprise idea to shut down the entire N.Y. metro area before Trump backed down. (New York Daily News) Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.35.13 AM
  90. Chow will they survive? – Without financial help soon, many city eateries will die. Jimmy’s Diner in Brooklyn and hundreds of other restaurants across the city wonder if they have served their last meals. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.36.11 AM
  91. Hope floats – Navy ship arrives in city to ease strain on hospitals. The Navy Hospital ship Comfort sails into New York Harbor and is welcomes by a grateful crowd (inset) before docking Monday on the West Side. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.36.36 AM
  92. “We’re on a suicide mission’ – Bronx hospital staff fights through fears, tears to save lives even as colleague dies. Sean Petty, a pediatric nurse at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx, wears his desperate need for a proper mask on his face. Petty is among countless nurses and doctors at city hospitals forced to fight coronavirus pandemic without adequate personal protective equipment. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.37.22 AM
  93. Gov Fears 16,000 Dead – The grim state death toll from the coronavirus would dwarf the tally from 9/11. (New York Daily News) Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.38.44 AM
  94. Running Out Of Air – In six days, New York will deplete its ventilator supply as cases soar toward 100,000 in the state. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.39.34 AM
  95. If Only It Were A Muzzle — President Trump announced on Friday that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded all people in the U.S. should wear “a basic cloth or fabric mask” whenever they go outside. Trump said, “I don’t think I’m going to be doing it.” (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.40.16 AM
  96. Ride On! — MTA getting 250G N95 masks to protect workers from infection. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.41.01 AM
  97. COVID-19 fosters new pain – CUNY kids forced from dorm return to city-provided parents. Queens College student Marcus Diego, who grew up in foster care, said it’s cruel to send students back to homes that are not really theirs. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.41.56 AM
  98. COVID Field – City eyes Hart Island for mass burials as grim toll nears 3,000. Hart Island north of the Bronx (inset) could be used as temporary resting place for coronavirus victims as funeral homes get overwhelmed. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.42.46 AM
  99. Death at Dad’s Door – Brooklyn man, 33, joins grim list of virus victims to die at home after hospital visit. Jorge Cruz of Brooklyn (with son, Logan) died Friday, apparently of COVID-19, after being sent home from hospital. Now his 2-year-old also has the disease, along with the tot’s mother. (New York Daily News)Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.43.31 AM
  100. Out Of Order — On March 12, the courtroom of Brooklyn Judge Johnny Baynes was jammed. He died of complications from COVID-19 two weeks later. (New York Daily News) Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 8.44.13 AM

As I read through the headlines, it was interesting to see how delayed the news was to covering the coronavirus pandemic as it was raging away in China and entering the US. Since the NY Daily News is a local paper, it can only feel the virus when it is local. This is similar to universe surfing in that we can really only feel the universe we are in. It is very difficult to quantum sense other universes, especially those that are far away. I would bet that the reporters and writers did quantum sense in January what was coming, and yet were too wrapped up in the matrix of the universe to write about what they were sensing. It is a hard enough to quantum sense and even more difficult to make a classical decision in the universe you are in that doesn’t align well with all of the other classical stuff going on in your universe. A ‘hack’ I use is to acknowledge that what I am sensing is a “quantum” variety, and not of this particular universe. Then, I feel like I can access it more readily and it requires less free will to talk about.

20200328 Day 88: World War C – Humans vs. Coronaviruses

Parallel Life Exploration (PLE) is one universe surfing technique that I use to help me understand what is going on in my own universe. Through PLE, I can get a fuller picture of my Quantum Self and also understand the Quantum Environment in which my Quantum Self is existing.

I am using the terms “Quantum Self” and “Quantum Environment” to refer to the Multiverse versions of “Self” and “Environment”. The Multiverse versions can be thought of as multidimensional and probabilistic. “Self” and “Environment” represent a single (classical) slice of their respective Multiverse versions.

Your Quantum Self is simultaneously existing in all of the possible universes that it could exist in without violating the (known and unknown) laws of physics. Similarly, the Quantum Environment is the superposition of all of the environments of these possible universes.

For example, this morning I had a brief feeling of a parallel world. I was watching a video that was attempting to encourage people to sacrifice more to fight the spread of this novel coronavirus that is infecting the entire population of the world. The video referenced war times and what past generations have had to suffer. It made a plea for people to just stay home and watch TV – how this was very little to ask compared to what has been asked in the past during war situations. It struct me that we are literally in a world war, World War C, with all of humanity against a 125 nm coronavirus. I then felt connected to the parallel world in which the world was at war but against each other – humans against humans – as has been in the past. I noticed the similar feelings of fear and helplessness that would exist in both universes. I noticed the similar loss of life that would occur in both universes. As a planet, we are beginning to resonate with the energy of a world war. US President Trump has been reluctant to use the Defense Production Act, but yesterday made a point to use it against General Motors for the making of additional ventilators which are in short supply. During times like now with high emotion, it is easier to Quantum Sense parallel realities. We are now in World War C.

As I attempt to surf back to a more peaceful universe, I want to take with me Chris Mann’s parody music video “My Corona”:

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 7.54.41 AM
My Corona by Chris Mann (https://chrismannmusic.com)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojrtwXqqc6g

20200218T Day 49: Kentaro Iwata leads Infectious Disease Control on Diamond Princess in Another Universe

After watching Kentaro Iwata’s video about his evaluation of infectious disease control (or lack thereof) on the Diamond Princess cruise ship, I can safely say there are quite a number of universes in which he was chosen to lead the ID control effort and the spread of COVID-19 was much less. His comments summarizing his findings are revealing:

Diamond Princess has completely inadequate infection control, and there is no professional ID person in charge. Passengers, crews, health care professionals working inside are at risk of infection, and the practice is even worse than what I saw in Africa. Immediate action is needed to save people inside.

I was curious about how the experience of the Diamond Princess compares with past infections of Influenza and found this 2010 paper: Outbreaks of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Seasonal Influenca A (H3N2) on Cruise Ship. A summary of the paper’s findings:

To determine the extent and pattern of influenza transmission and effectiveness of containment measures, we investigated dual outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and influenza A (H3N2) that had occurred on a cruise ship in May 2009. Of 1,970 passengers and 734 crew members, 82 (3.0%) were infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 98 (3.6%) with influenza A (H3N2) virus, and 2 (0.1%) with both.

Does the increased infection rate of COVID-19 on the Princess Diamond mean that COVID-19 is that much more infectious? Or does it mean that, as Kentaro Iwata noticed, there was no real infectious disease control occurring on the Princess Diamond.

Update 2020-0219: Adding graph of Princess Diamond infections-to-date. I wonder how this graph looks in the universes where Kentaro Iwata, or someone equally qualified, was in charge. I hate feeling the universe where someone knew that the ship infectious disease control was substandard and decided against saying anything out of a desire to get “real data” on how COVID-19 spreads in a “more realistic” environment.

Screen Shot 2020-02-19 at 12.37.52 PM

20200214F Day 45: Near Universe where 2019 Novel Coronavirus is in Austin

IMG_1686

Today, the CDC announced that individuals who display flu-like symptoms and who test negative for the flu should be tested for coronavirus. This is to start in a few of the larger cities (e.g. San Francisco, New York). Also today, I went to the urgent care with my partner to get tested for the flu. She has flu-like symptoms and tested negative for the flu. We asked about testing for novel coronavirus and the doctor had heard something about it being tested in some cities. She told us not to worry because COVID-19 has only a 2% mortality rate and that the flu kills many more people. She seemed to imply that the flu has a higher mortality rate, but I didn’t want to get into a math lesson with her when I figured she was just trying to ease our worries. “The only coronavirus confirmed case is in quarantine in San Antonio”, she said. She also mentioned that a number of people had been in today with flu symptoms and for some reason the flu tests were coming back negative. “Maybe something wrong with the flu tests”, she said. I mentioned that we had just flown in the day before from California. This didn’t seem to raise any concern. She knew about the Diamond Princess cases – she called the ship the “death ship” and was appalled that people were being kept on it instead of being quarentined in their own country.

I did notice the sign on the front door about letting them know if you believe you may have been exposed to COVID-19. I’m curious if the doctor would have still welcomed us with a handshake if we came in wearing masks.

20200209u Day 40: Conspiracy Theories in Multiple Realities

Screen Shot 2020-02-09 at 10.06.33 PM

When feeling into the quantum field of multiple worlds, I find it difficult to not fall down a rabbit hole of conspiracy theories. One thing I do to stay grounded is pay attention to the classical facts that are continually present in the universe I’m in. I also acknowledge that due to the infinite nature of parallel worlds, almost all conspiracy theories are true in at least one reality. I don’t ask myself then whether a conspiracy theory is true or not. Instead, I ask myself how close it is to me – to my current classical reality. I also underweight conspiracy theories that I sense are being promoted for reasons other than reporting the truth.

As an example, consider the recent research paper which was preprinted on bioRxiv on Jan. 31, 2020 (doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/2020.01.30.927871) entitled Uncanny similarity of unique inserts in the 2019-nCoV spike protein to HIV-1 gp120 and Gag. This paper was retracted only a few days later. Some comments about it …

From https://www.statnews.com/2020/02/03/retraction-faulty-coronavirus-paper-good-moment-for-science/ :

The paper, from academic institutions in New Delhi, India, was critical and alarming, if true. Except that it wasn’t.

and this from https://theprepared.com/blog/no-the-2019-ncov-genome-doesnt-actually-seem-engineered-from-hiv/

In other words, the sequence overlap is not actually uncanny, and there is no big scoop here. The group in India fell prey to some of the pitfalls of bioinformatics research.

and factcheck.org also debunked the research article as a baseless conspiracy theory:

Several online stories inaccurately claim that the new coronavirus contains HIV “insertions” and shows signs of being created in a lab. But there is no evidence that the new virus was bioengineered, and every indication it came from an animal.

and ChinaDaily.com.cn article Coronavirus conspiracy debunked by Wuhan researcher:

A scientist from the Wuhan Institute of Virology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has debunked a recent conspiracy which claimed the novel coronavirus was manufactured and escaped from the institute’s most advanced biocontainment facility.

Shi Zhengli, a researcher from the institute, said on her social media on Sunday the virus was the result of “nature punishing the uncivilized habits and customs of humans”, and she is willing to “bet my life that [the outbreak] has nothing to do with the lab.”

Shi was the leading scientist who made the discovery the novel coronavirus can enter cells through ACE2 receptors and may have originated from bats.

Her comments came after Indian scientists recently published a non-peer reviewed paper suggesting scientists had artificially inserted genes from the HIV virus into the coronavirus, thus making it susceptible to anti-HIV treatments.

The paper was immediately panned by experts around the world and retracted from biology journal server bioRxiv on Sunday.

In a Twitter post commenting on the paper, David Liu, a chemistry professor from Harvard University, said: “The mere claim that such short inserts support nCoV origins ‘unlikely to be fortuitous in nature’ is already highly suspect.”

“This is a classic case of searching for lost keys only under a lamppost,” he said. “A fearful world does not need to fuel conspiracy theories with bad analyses.”

The last quote about searching for lost keys only under a lamppost is one I especially like. I’ve often told that joke. However, I’ve also learned that I can find my lost keys specifically by looking for them “under a lamppost”. I don’t end up finding them there, but the act of looking for them there seems to removed the lamppost as a possibility and once I’ve checked enough lampposts, then I can often look in the grass between the lampposts and find them.

After withdrawing the paper preprint, one of the authors commented:

While we appreciate the criticisms and comments provided by scientific colleagues at BioRxiv forum and elsewhere, the story has been differently interpreted and shared by social media and news platforms.

We have positively received all criticisms and comments. To avoid further misinterpretation and confusions world-over, we have decided to withdraw the current version of the preprint.

But just when you think everyone is in the same universe, evidence of interference between two sets of universes – one natural virus and one man-made virus – is still seen. The Taiwan News reports Chinese military news agency discloses 2019-nCoV was product of lab: Guide Wengui:

As conspiracies about the origin of the Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV) surface in recent weeks, exiled Chinese businessman Guo Wengui (郭文貴) said on Tuesday (Feb. 4) that Chinese military news network Xilu claimed the virus was engineered by the United States, which is strangely at odds with what Chinese health authorities have said.

@DrEricDing has some ideas on threader journalling his trip down the rabbit hole – with references!

At this point, the origin of 2019-nCoV is still in a superposition of states (wild and man-made), at least for most of the people on the planet.

 

 

2020 Day 27: SP500 has largest single-day drop since Oct 2, 2019

The S&P 500, Dow, and Nasdaq all fell over 1.5% today. This is in alignment with the feeling I mentioned in 2020 Day 25: Wuhan Coronavirus in the Year of the Rat. However, the feeling I felt seemed to be further in the future. What’s more interesting to me is how I’ve been affected – specifically my desire to remove an old habit of checking the stock market. It seems that as my will power strengthened, the multiverse showed me her power and tested my will power until I eventually succumbed and checked the stock market. I now feel surrounded by lots of universes where I check the stock market multiple times daily. The multiverse amuses me when she shows herself to me in this fashion – humbling my ego that believes that free will alone can get me to where I want to go.

Coronavirus update:

  1. First coronavirus death in Beijing;
  2. 82 deaths and over 2,700 cases confirmed in mainland China;
  3. China reports that people can spread the coronavirus before symptoms, although CDC says no clear evidence that this is the case;
  4. Sri Lanka reports first case of Wuhan coronavirus;
  5. Cambodia reports first case of Wuhan coronavirus;
  6. Canada’s first two cases of Wuhan coronavirus are husband and wife;

2020 Day 25: Wuhan Coronavirus in the Year of the Rat

WuhanCoronavirus20200124

Photo Credit: The Institute of Microbiology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences released yesterday the first close-up images of the Wuhan Coronavirus.

Sixteen days ago I decided to write a blog post: 2020 Day 9: New Strain of Coronavirus found in Wuhan, China. Eight days ago I felt called to dive into the details of the Wuhan Coronavirus in a second blog post: 2020 Day 17: Wuhan Coronavirus infections in Thailand and Japan. I’m now beginning to wonder if these two blog posts will be understood more clearly through a universe surfing viewpoint that does not require time to move in only one direction, and instead allows for anyone to quantum feel possible futures. Quantum feeling is different than prediction. Prediction assumes a classical arrow of time in one direction and looks for cause-and-effect relationship to justify a predicted outcome. Quantum feeling assumes a bi-directional arrow of time and allows future events to “cause” events that precede it, in our normal classical way of measuring time. Quantum feeling starts with an unexpected event – such as me deciding to blog about a new strain of coronavirus – and then imagines different futures that would be connected to that unexpected event when looking backwards in time from the future. Quantum feeling is a key step in universe surfing because it shows you a window to your possible futures in a way that expected events, such as habits, cannot.

In the last week, the following events have happened:

  • Five days ago (Jan. 20), the first case of “Novel Coronavirus” was reported in the Republic of Korea (WHO news: Novel Coronavirus – Republic of Korea). This case involved a 35-year-old female who resides in Wuhan and who did not report visiting any wet markets (such as Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market from where environmental samples have tested positive for the virus).
  • Four days ago (Jan. 21), the CDC confirmed the first U.S. case of the Wuhan Coronavirus in a male traveler from Wuhan who resides in Seattle, Washington.
  • Three days ago (Jan. 22), researchers published an article with genomic evidence of cross-species transmission from snake to human.
  • Two days ago (Jan. 23), the CDC raised its travel alert for the coronavirus outbreak to Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel. The CDC is still calling it an ‘outbreak’ versus an epidemic or pandemic. Guan Yi, a virology professor at the University of Hong Kong, director of the State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, and member of team that first identified SARS, believes that the scale of infection will eventually be 10 times higher than SARS. After visiting Wuhan, he said
    • “I’ve experienced so much and I never felt scared. Most of them are controllable. But this time I’m afraid.”

  • Yesterday (Jan. 24), the CDC confirmed the second U.S. case in a female traveler from Wuhan (Jan. 13) who resides in Chicago, Illinois. Over 1200 confirmed cases and at least 41 deaths in mainland China have been tied to the Wuhan Coronavirus. Factcheck reports that social media posts are spreading a bogus Coronavirus conspiracy theory that the virus was made in a lab and purposely released in order to make money selling a vaccine that has already been developed. Researchers reported in a preprint that basic reproduction number of the Wuhan coronavirus infection (R_0) is 3.6-4.0, which indicates that to keep the number of infections from increasing, 72-75% of the transmissions must be prevented by control measures. The first cases (3 in France) of the virus were confirmed in Europe. Cases of the coronavirus have been confirmed now in Mainland China (1287), France (3), Hong Kong (5), Japan, Macau (2), Nepal, Australia (1), Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan (3), Thailand, the United States (2) and Vietnam. In an interesting universe merging, Saudi Arabia denied reports of a case of Wuhan Coronavirus and instead reported that a male Indian nurse tested posted for MERS, which is caused by a different coronavirus with a similar genetic sequence. The number of google search results for “wuhan coronavirus” increased from 14.6M yesterday evening to 17.9M this morning and 20.4M this evening. For reference, MERS has 62.7M google results and SARS has 86.3M.
  • Today (Jan. 25) is the first day of the Lunar New Year – the year of the Rat, the first year of the 12-year cycle of animals. 15 cities in Hubei province are on lockdown with public and commercial transportation in and out of the cities suspended. Shanghai reported its first coronavirus death. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam announced an emergency, closed schools for two weeks, and cancelled a four-day carnival and fireworks show.

Quantum sensing can also appear as a déjà vu feeling. Laurie Garrett, a reporter for CNN, reported yesterday that when she read reports of patients exhibiting symptoms of pneumonia as early as December 12, 2019, she had a “chilling sense of déjà vu”. Seventeen years ago she reported on the SARS virus pandemic that caused illness in at least 8000 people across 37 countries and was associated with at least 774 deaths, including 299 in Hong Kong.

Quantum sensing can also appear as fear. Guan Yi’s quote above (“but this time I’m afraid”) is not encouraging.

Universe interference can be seen when events happen that appear to come from a different universe. For instance, Dr. Liang Wudong fell ill last week and died from an Wuhan coronavirus infection. He had been the head of the ear, nose and throat department at one of Wuhan’s top hospitals, Hubei Xinhua Hospital. He was “at the front line” fighting against the coronavirus. However, he also retired last year and there’s a universe where he was not involved in fighting the coronavirus. The Wall Street Journal’s reporting was perhaps affected by this universe when someone wrote “It isn’t clear if Dr. Liang had been involved in the treatment of other patients.” Or maybe they were just trying to calm the stock market and make sure that the party continues. I’m feeling now a universe where the stock market is negatively affected by the Wuhan coronavirus.

WuhanCoronavirusCloseup20200124

Photo Credit: IVDC, China CDC

2020 Day 9: New Strain of Coronavirus found in Wuhan, China

Wuhan is the capital of Hubei province in central China. I stopped in Wuhan a year ago instead of Hong Kong on a flight between Austin and Bangkok. The flight on China Southern was half the price of flying other airlines, like Cathay Pacific. The problem I noticed was that the weather in Wuhan was much colder than in Austin or Thailand, and so I needed to pack warmer clothes just for the layover – not ideal. Also, on the return flight through China, even though my ticket showed a single stop, the airlines ended up making a second stop and everyone had to get off the plane and wait for a couple hours to go through a customs-like search. I remember one passenger shouting during this time how annoyed he was for this surprise experience. While I was also annoyed, I also found amusement in seeing another example of the multiverse working it’s magic. I could feel the universe where we didn’t have the unexpected stop, and also the universe where the ticket displayed correctly the extra stop. I saw the universe I was experience as one created by the interference pattern of these two other universes.

Today it is being reported that the Wuhan pneumonia outbreak “mystery illness” that has infected 60 people in the last 2 weeks is caused by a new coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a species of viruses blamed for such deadly illnesses as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Coronaviruses are enveloped viruses (HIV-1 is also an enveloped virus), which means they have an outer phospholipid bilayer membrane that includes some viral glycoproteins. The viral glycoproteins act as Trojan horse to gain entry into a host cell and also help the virus hide from the host immune system. Coronaviruses have a single-stranded, positive-sense, non-segmented, RNA genome which is the largest of all RNA viruses at around 30,000 bases. Because it is positive-sense and also contains a 5’ cap structure and 3’ poly (A) tail, it can mimic mRNA and be directly translated by the host of the replicase polyproteins, which are encoded by the approximately 20,000 base replicase gene. The replicase polyproteins assemble to form a viral replicase complex that, as you may guess, makes copies of the virus. The remaining 10,000 or so bases encode structural and accessory proteins. The four main structural proteins (all encoded within the 3’ end of the viral genome) are the spike, membrane, envelope, and nucelocapsid proteins. The spike protein has an N-terminal signal sequence that allows it to gain access to the host cell endoplasmic reticulum where it is heavily N-linked glycosylated. Three spike proteins join together to form a club-shape spike projection. These virion projections give the virus the appearance of a solar corona, from which their name derives. For a size perspective, the diameter of the coronaviruse virion is about 125 nm, so a meter long thin straw of diameter 125 nm filled with the virions would contain 8 million virions. For comparison, a single nucleotide is 0.33 nm long and so 30,000 bases has a length of 10,000 nm! Imagine fitting that into a 125 nm diameter virion.

Four identified coronaviruses (HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, and HCoV-HKU1) are endemic in humans and cause up to 30% of respiratory tract infections worldwide each year. HCoV-NL63 has been associated with acute laryngotracheitis (croup). Coronoviruses have different tolerances to genetic variability with some (i.e. HCoV-229E) having little genetic variability worldwide and primarily isolated in humans and others (i.e. HCoV-OC43) showing high genetic variability across time and location. Most cases of coronavirus infection are self-limiting and will naturally run its course.

I’ve been sick with a respiratory infection for about two weeks. A few days ago I tried out my video-doctor health plan and got a prescription for Amoxicillin antibiotics. I also went to Accupuncture and purchased some Chinese herbs. I didn’t pick up the antibiotics prescription and I tried the herbs instead. That night I didn’t sleep well and I felt my body releasing a lot of toxins. My throat was still feeling scratching in the morning with nasal drip collecting in the back of my throat. Once I spit the thick yellow mucus out each morning, I felt fine. I decided to treat myself with water and rest over the next couple of days. I felt the universe where I was taking the antibiotics. I felt the universe where I had continued taking the herbs. I felt the universe where I was drinking more water and resting (and taking a zinc lounge now and then for good luck). Right now I still feel like I have a swollen throat, but it isn’t sore. I didn’t have much mucus this morning. My nasal passages are mostly clear. I expect the three universes to merge together tomorrow and I will feel infection free. Now if I could just find a way to clear the cedar pollen out of the air!

REFERENCE: Methods Mol Biol. 2015; Pehr and Perlman, Coronaviruses: An Overview of Their Replication and Pathogenesis